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// some arbitrary function 
template<typename T>
void log( T&& obj )
{
    std::cout << obj << std::endl;    
}

// arbitrary transformation
template<typename T>
T convert(T&& obj) { 
     return obj; 
}

template<template <typename> typename F, typename... T>
void callOn( F<T> func,  ///  issue: what's the type of func?                 
             T&&... params)
{
    func(std::forward<T>(convert(std::forward<T>(params)))...);
}

int main()
{   
    callOn(log, -1, -2.0);      
     return 0;
}

Is this possible at all?

Compiler complains: no matching function for call to 'callOn(, ..>). Why ?

Update: suppose log is not unary function

template<typename T>
void log(T&& value) { std::cout << value << std::endl; }

template<typename First, typename... Rest>
void log(First&& f, Rest&&... rest)
{
    std::cout << f << ",";
    log(std::forward<Rest>(rest)...);
}

callOn takes type "template " which doesn't match the type of log? How to specify the type of func?

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2  
Meta meta programming? We must go deeper! –  Mr. Llama Apr 25 '12 at 18:15
    
wild guess: have you tried template <typename...> typename F? –  Philipp Apr 25 '12 at 18:26
    
@Philipp : That was my thought as well, but then the question makes little sense, as callOn(log, -1, -2.0); would attempt to pass two arguments to log, which is unary. –  ildjarn Apr 25 '12 at 18:32
    
@ildjarn if log also accepts variadic params, how should callOn be defined? –  Candy Chiu Apr 25 '12 at 18:35
    
Say template <template <typename...> F, typename ...Args> void callOn(F<Args...> f, Args... args); –  Kerrek SB Apr 25 '12 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a function object. Here's a compilable example:

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

struct Log
{
    template<typename T> void operator()(T&& t) { 
        std::cout << t << std::endl; 
    }

    template<typename T, typename... Rest> void operator()(T&& t, Rest&&... rest)
    {
        std::cout << t << ", ";
        (*this)(std::forward<Rest>(rest)...);
    }
};

template<typename T>
T convert(T&& obj) {
     return obj;
}

template<typename F, typename... T>
void callOn(F funcobj, T&&... params)
{
    funcobj(std::forward<T>(convert(std::forward<T>(params)))...);
}

int main()
{
    callOn(Log(), -1, -2.17, "abc");
    return 0;
}
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The inner std::forward (wrapping the call to convert) is not needed and will likely interfere if it's intended that some overload of convert does special things. –  Luc Danton Apr 26 '12 at 6:46

I don't think the syntax of template <typename> typename F is correct, and Standard specified in 14.3.3/1 that "A template-argument for a template template-parameter shall be the name of a class template or an alias template", not a function template. If you want to pass a function template, you can declare the parameter as a pointer to function:

template<typename... T>
void callOn( void (*func)(T&&...params),
             T&&... params)
{
    //same as before
}

And when callOn(log, -1, -2.0); is called, the type of T is not deduced from log but from {-1, -2.0} to be {int, double}, then func is initialized from the pointer pointed to log<int, double>(int&&, double&&).

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Is it possible to express the function pointer as a std::function? –  Candy Chiu Apr 26 '12 at 12:34
    
void (*func)(T&&...) works, but std::function<void(T&&...)> func does not. Compiler complains that it cannot resolve overloaded function 'log' based on conversion to type 'std::function<void(const int&, double&&, ...)>' –  Candy Chiu Apr 26 '12 at 14:30
    
You're right that template <typename> typename F is not correct, but your rationale is wrong -- template <typename> class F is indeed valid, it just requires the use of a templated functor rather than a function template. –  ildjarn Apr 26 '12 at 17:04
    
Yes, that's valid template template-parameter syntax, and I said that it only accepts a class template argument. –  Cosyn Apr 27 '12 at 1:45

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