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My problem is that, when trying to run MYSQL on Fedora, I am faced with the following error:

mysql: unknown variable 'max_connections=40'

It does the exact same thing for any other of the commands, such as mysqldump, mysqlcheck etc etc

The my.cnf file reads the following, though I've renamed it and the error still occurs. It almost seems like it's a system variable that I am unable to edit without running mysql, thus the catch 22!

[mysqld]
datadir=/var/lib/mysql
socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
user=mysql
# Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks
symbolic-links=0

[mysqld_safe]
log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log
pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid

I've also of course checked the system for any other my.cnf files.

I'm really lost and starting to tear my hair out. Any help would be greatly appreciated! :)

Thanks

Matt

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Search your system for any other my.cnf files that may be hiding. –  Mike Purcell Apr 25 '12 at 18:44
    
This isn't related to programming, this belongs to ServerFault. –  KurzedMetal Apr 25 '12 at 18:46
    
I've grep'd the system and it's not giving any other my.cnf files. And I didn't even know serverfault existed ha... –  Matt Fletcher Apr 25 '12 at 18:54
    
@MattFletcher: You wouldn't grep, you would use find: find / -name my.cnf -type f –  Mike Purcell Apr 25 '12 at 19:31
    
Ah yes, just a slipup. I've ran both find and grepping for 'max_connections' but neither yield any results... although actually grepping for max_connections got "Binary file /bin/dbus-daemon matches". Could that mean anything?? Cheers! –  Matt Fletcher Apr 25 '12 at 19:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

assuming that your good configuration file is /etc/my.cnf (which may not be), edit your mysql init file and add --init-file /etc/my.cnf to the mysqld command to make sure that it is indeed reading from the the init file that you think it is reading from.

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I tried that, returned this: [root@XYZ init.d]# ./mysqld start --init-file /etc/my.cnf ..... /usr/bin/mysqladmin: unknown variable 'max_connections=40' ..... Cannot check for MySQL Daemon startup because of mysqladmin failure. ..... Starting mysqld: [FAILED] –  Matt Fletcher Apr 25 '12 at 19:07
1  
do you have any client side conf? such as .my.cnf? try to use a non-root user and run the same client command such as mysqladmin. –  johnshen64 Apr 25 '12 at 19:52
    
Aha! /root/.my.conf does exist and contains the offending line. Odd that grep didn't find it. Thank you very much, I owe you one internet pint :) –  Matt Fletcher Apr 25 '12 at 19:57
    
very happy that you found the problem. your pint gladly accepted. –  johnshen64 Apr 25 '12 at 20:05

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