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On SO, found the following simple algorithm for drawing filled circles:

for(int y=-radius; y<=radius; y++)
    for(int x=-radius; x<=radius; x++)
        if(x*x+y*y <= radius*radius)
            setpixel(origin.x+x, origin.y+y);

Is there an equally simple algorithm for drawing filled ellipses?

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2  
See this question: math.stackexchange.com/questions/5799/… –  Greg Hewgill Apr 25 '12 at 19:24
    
Sure that this never misses a pixel due to rounding? It looks like it would. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 25 '12 at 19:36
    
@KonradRudolph, this looks like it's integer arithmetic so there's no rounding involved. –  Mark Ransom Apr 25 '12 at 19:38
    
@Mark But implied. It will still miss pixels. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 25 '12 at 20:15
1  
@DarenW: My particular project is for rendering the phases of the moon on an embedded device. I do that by rendering half of a circle and half of an ellipse. If I had a algorithm that could draw an ellipse at arbitrary angle, I could more closely render the moon as it is seen from a given latitude. –  Roger Dahl Apr 26 '12 at 17:22
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Simpler, with no double and no division (but be careful of integer overflow):

for(int y=-height; y<=height; y++) {
    for(int x=-width; x<=width; x++) {
        if(x*x*height*height+y*y*width*width <= height*height*width*width)
            setpixel(origin.x+x, origin.y+y);
    }
}

We can take advantage of two facts to optimize this significantly:

  • Ellipses have vertical and horizontal symmetry;
  • As you progress away from an axis, the contour of the ellipse slopes more and more.

The first fact saves three-quarters of the work (almost); the second fact tremendously reduces the number of tests (we test only along the edge of the ellipse, and even there we don't have to test every point).

int hh = height * height;
int ww = width * width;
int hhww = hh * ww;
int x0 = width;
int dx = 0;

// do the horizontal diameter
for (int x = -width; x <= width; x++)
    setpixel(origin.x + x, origin.y);

// now do both halves at the same time, away from the diameter
for (int y = 1; y <= height; y++)
{
    int x1 = x0 - (dx - 1);  // try slopes of dx - 1 or more
    for ( ; x1 > 0; x1--)
        if (x1*x1*hh + y*y*ww <= hhww)
            break;
    dx = x0 - x1;  // current approximation of the slope
    x0 = x1;

    for (int x = -x0; x <= x0; x++)
    {
        setpixel(origin.x + x, origin.y - y);
        setpixel(origin.x + x, origin.y + y);
    }
}

This works because each scan line is shorter than the previous one, by at least as much as that one was shorter than the one before it. Because of rounding to integer pixel coordinates, that's not perfectly accurate -- the line can be shorter by one pixel less that that.

In other words, starting from the longest scan line (the horizontal diameter), the amount by which each line is shorter than the previous one, denoted dx in the code, decreases by at most one, stays the same, or increases. The first inner for finds the exact amount by which the current scan line is shorter than the previous one, starting at dx - 1 and up, until we land just inside the ellipse.

                       |         x1 dx x0
                       |######    |<-->|
 current scan line --> |###########    |<>|previous dx
previous scan line --> |################  |
two scan lines ago --> |###################
                       |##################### 
                       |###################### 
                       |######################
                       +------------------------

To compare the number of inside-ellipse tests, each asterisk is one pair of coordinates tested in the naive version:

 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************
 *********************************************

... and in the improved version:

                        *
                             **
                                  ****
                                       ***
                                          ***
                                            ***
                                             **
                                             **
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Thank you for this improvement. Could you fix the code by changing dx and dy to x and y? –  Roger Dahl Apr 25 '12 at 19:52
2  
Oh, if it's performance you want, you can just run y from 0 to height, and do two setpixels in the inner loop, one for origin.y+y and one for origin.y-y. –  Mr Lister Apr 25 '12 at 19:55
2  
If it's performance you want, then you use a different algorithm. You do away with the inner loop. For each y, the algorithm finds the x of the leftmost and rightmost pixels that belong to the ellipse; then you simply draw horizontal lines. The finding of the line ends is very simple if you're allowed to take a square root, but, with a little effort, can be modified to integer-only (a little like Bresenham's algorithm). –  cvoinescu Apr 25 '12 at 22:18
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An ellipse (about the origin) is a circle that has been linearly stretched along the x or y axes. So you can modify your loop like this:

for(int y=-height; y<=height; y++) {
    for(int x=-width; x<=width; x++) {
        double dx = (double)x / (double)width;
        double dy = (double)y / (double)height;
        if(dx*dx+dy*dy <= 1)
            setpixel(origin.x+x, origin.y+y);
    }
}

You can see that if width == height == radius, then this is equivalent to your code for drawing a circle.

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Better to move that double dy to outer scope for efficiency... –  Gleno Apr 25 '12 at 19:34
3  
With the setpixel() in the inner loop, the whole algorithm isn't likely to be efficient anyway. Also, any optimising compiler will lift the dy calculation out of the x loop. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 25 '12 at 19:35
    
If you multiply all terms by width*height you can make it integer arithmetic. It simplifies to x*height*x*height+y*width*y*width <= width*height*width*height. –  Mark Ransom Apr 25 '12 at 19:41
    
--- Brilliant --- –  Roger Dahl Apr 25 '12 at 19:41
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Replace

x*x+y*y <= radius*radius

with

Axx*x*x + 2*Axy*x*y + Ayy*y*y < radius*radius

where you have three constants, Axx, Axy, Ayy. When Axy=0, the ellipse will have its axes straight horizontal and vertical. Axx=Ayy=1 makes a circle. The bigger Axx, the smaller the width. Similar for Ayy and height. For an arbitrary ellipse tilted at any given angle, it takes a bit of algebra to figure out the constants.

Mathematically Axx, Axy, Ayy are a "tensor" but perhaps you don't want to get into that stuff.

UPDATE - detailed math. I don't think S.O. can make nice math like Math S.E. so this will look crude. tilted ellipse with x',y' coords aligned with ellipse, x,y straight horizontal,vertical You want to draw (or do whatever) with an ellipse in x,y coordinates. The ellipse is tilted. We create an alternative coordinate system x',y' aligned with the ellipse. Clearly, points on the ellipse satisfy

(x'/a)^2 + (y'/b)^2 = 1  

By contemplating some well-chosen random points we see that

x' =  C*x + S*y
y' = -S*x + C*y

where S, C are sin(θ) and cos(θ), θ being the angle of the x' axis w.r.t. the x axis. We can shorten this with notation x = (x,y) and similar for primed, and R a 2x2 matrix involving C and S:

x' = R x

The ellipse equation can be written

T(x') A'' x' = 1

where 'T' to indicates transpose and, dropping '^' to avoid poking everyone in the eyes, so that "a2" really means a^2,

A'' =

1/a2     0  
 0     1/b2

Using x' = Rx we find

T(Rx) A'' Rx = 1

T(x) T(R) A'' R x =1

T(x) A x = 1

where A, the thing you need to know to make your tilted drawing scan line algorithm work, is

A = T(R) A'' R =

C2/a2+S2/b2     SC(1/a2-1/b2)
SC/(1/a2-1/b2)  S2/a2 + C2/b2    

Multiply these expressions by x and y according to xAx and you've got it.

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1  
Thank you for this. Any chance you can add a reply with a complete algorithm that also takes an angle? –  Roger Dahl Apr 26 '12 at 17:17
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