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-(void)buttonClick:(id)sender
{    
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;
    for(int i=0;i<500000000;i++)
    {
        //Simulates network activity
    }
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
}

Theoretically, the network activity spinner in the top left corner of the screen should turn on, spin for a while, then turn off...however, it never shows up.

-(void)buttonClick:(id)sender
{
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;
    for(int i=0;i<500000000;i++)
    {
        //Simulates network activity
    }
    //[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
}

With "= NO" being commented out, I noticed that the program runs through the entire for loop, then after completion of the for loop, the spinner finally starts spinning.

-(void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES
}

-(void)buttonClick:(id)sender
{
    for(int i=0;i<500000000;i++)
    {
        //Simulates network activity
    }
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
}

Now, when the view appears, the indicator starts spinning. When I click the button, it continues spinning while the loop is running. When the for loop ends, the spinner stops as expected.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

My question is this, why won't the spinner start spinning till after the for loop in the first 2 examples?

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

My thinking thus far:

In terms of why the spinner won't start in this specific example...Perhaps it sends the message, but doesn't get executed till after the for loop, because of how the compiled code works?

Perhaps the correct way of doing this is to enable the network activity indicator, then shoot off another thread that does the network activity, then that thread shoots a message back to the main thread when it's done (presumably with the data it retrieved as well)

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Any advice/answers are appreciated. Thanks in advance. Keep in mind this app is for iPad.

share|improve this question
    
I think you answered your own question. –  onnoweb Apr 25 '12 at 19:57
    
Perhaps...I'm still exploring this problem and looking for the "correct" way of doing network activity –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The UI will not update until the end of the current run loop. Your method currently blocks the main thread whilst doing it's work, which does not give your program a chance to reach the end of the runloop.

So what you need to do is take your long running task off of the main thread

[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0), ^{

    for(int i=0;i<500000000;i++)
    {
        //Simulates network activity
    }

    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
This does exactly what I want to do! However, after clicking the button a few times, I notice a huge slow down in app speed that gets worse with every click. I'm going to guess that the thread we spit off here doesn't ever get killed. –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 21:00
    
Scratch that, I had other code that was slowing things down. This works perfectly! –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 21:11
    
Technically this could end up returning the same queue every time you tap the button so essentially that queue of work will keep building up so you may see the effect of all those jobs holding each other up. –  Paul.s Apr 25 '12 at 21:12
    
Yea, if you shoot off more of these before older ones finish, they'll definately start clogging up the memory. However, this does seem to kill the extra thread upon completion. It was some other code of mine that I was having a problem with. Thanks a ton man! –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 21:15

Create a method for the //Simulate network activity stuff and the just call that method with

- (void)performSelector:(SEL)aSelector withObject:(id)anArgument afterDelay:(NSTimeInterval)delay

Something like:

-(void)buttonClick:(id)sender
{   
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
        [self performSelector:@selector(simulateNetworkActivity) withObject:nil afterDelay:0];
    });
}

The method containing something like:

-(void)simulateNetworkActivity
{
    for(int i=0;i<500000000;i++)
    {
        //Simulates network activity
    }
    [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've actually used this method before, but it doesn't do what we're aiming for. Your method says "In X seconds, call the simulateNetworkActivity Method". Also, the network activity spinner still doesn't appear with your code =/ –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 20:20
    
...After another look, does performSelector actually spit off a new thread to run that method? –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 20:26
    
You were correct. I always use NSOperation for heavier calculations and stuff :) But I have added code to solve async easily. –  Nic Apr 25 '12 at 20:34
    
Aside from having very little clue what your updated code does (somehow makes the new thread asynchronous from the main thread), "dispatch_async(queue, (void)^{" is giving me a syntax error –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 20:48
    
5.1 actually, you're code is close, but the other "answer" has the correct syntax –  Highrule Apr 25 '12 at 21:03

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