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I am trying to find a way to get the base class of a template parameter.

Consider the following class:

template <class C>
class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo(){};
        ~Foo(){};
        C* ptr;
};

if C is a reference (e.g. Test&) then ptr is type C&*

But I need to get a pointer the base class whether C is a reference, a pointer or anything else.

  • if C is Test& then ptr need to be Test*,
  • if C is Test* then ptr needs to be Test*,
  • if C is Test then ptr needs to be Test*, etc.

Is there anyway to get the "base" class of C so I can create the pointer I need ?

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2  
What if C is Test*** or Test[1][2]? Or Test const*? –  James McNellis Apr 25 '12 at 20:15
    
I don't have time to write a full answer, but check into (i.e. Google) partial template specialization for reference and pointer types. –  tmpearce Apr 25 '12 at 20:17
    
Good books on this topic are: D. Vandevoorde, N.M. Josuttis "C++ templates. The complete guide" and Alexandrescu "Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied". These books contain huge examples like this and give a taste of template metaprogramming techniques like traits and strategies. –  parallelgeek Apr 25 '12 at 20:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about using std::remove_reference?

#include <type_traits>

template <class C>
class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo(){};
        ~Foo(){};
        std::remove_reference<C>::type *ptr;
};
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If you really need the underlying element type, you can use recursive applications of the removal type manipulation traits:

#include <type_traits>

// precv = pointer, reference, extents, const, and volatile
template <typename T>
struct remove_precv
{
    typedef typename std::remove_pointer<
            typename std::remove_reference<
            typename std::remove_all_extents<
            typename std::remove_cv<T>::type>::type>::type>::type type;
};

template <typename T, typename U>
struct element_type_impl
{
    typedef typename element_type_impl<
            typename remove_precv<T>::type, T>::type type;
};

template <typename T>
struct element_type_impl<T, T>
{
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct element_type
{
    struct null_type { };
    typedef typename element_type_impl<T, null_type>::type type;
};

For example, element_type<int***[42]>::type is int.

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of remove_precv, I think std::decay might work here too, as noted in Kerrek SB's answer. I wasn't familiar with that manipulation trait, and I'm not quite sure what its behavior is. –  James McNellis Apr 25 '12 at 21:14
    
decay will also transform arrays and function types which may not be desired (of course in the q we only have classes). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 26 '12 at 8:42

Do this:

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
    typedef typename std::remove_pointer<typename std::decay<T>::type>::type C;
    // ...
};

decay removes references and CV-qualifications, and remove_pointer removes pointers.

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You can do this with a little bit of template meta-programming, for example:

#include <cassert>
#include <typeinfo>

template <typename T>
struct unpoint {
  typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct unpoint<T*> {
  typedef typename unpoint<T>::type type;
};

int main() {
  int *a;
  int **b;
  int ***c;
  int ****d;

  const std::type_info& t1=typeid(unpoint<decltype(a)>::type);
  const std::type_info& t2=typeid(unpoint<decltype(b)>::type);
  const std::type_info& t3=typeid(unpoint<decltype(c)>::type);
  const std::type_info& t4=typeid(unpoint<decltype(d)>::type);
  assert(t1 == t2);
  assert(t1 == t3);
  assert(t1 == t4);
}

Where the specialisation of unpoint removes the pointer and recursively calls itself until there are no pointers left in the type.

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