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That is what i want to achieve:

enter image description here

As you see, horizontal scroll is changed and a JLabel("text") should be added in the same line. Currently i find the way to change horizontal scroll (like on image), but i can't find any way to add JLabel("text") in the place, where it is placed on the image.

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Container;
import java.awt.Point;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.ScrollPaneLayout;
import javax.swing.WindowConstants;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JFrame jFrame = new JFrame();
        jFrame.setSize(300, 300);

        JPanel myPanel = new JPanel();
        myPanel.add(new JLabel("Check Check Check Check Check Check Check Check"));
        MyScrollPane scrollPane = new MyScrollPane(myPanel);

        jFrame.add(scrollPane);
        jFrame.setVisible(true);
        jFrame.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
    }

}

class MyScrollPane extends JScrollPane {

    JLabel label = new JLabel("text");

    public MyScrollPane(Component view) {
        super(view, VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS, HORIZONTAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS);
        this.setLayout(new MyLayout(label));
        add(label);
    }
}

class MyLayout extends ScrollPaneLayout {

    JLabel label;

    public MyLayout(JLabel aLabel) {
        super();
        label = aLabel;
    }

    public void layoutContainer(Container parent) {
        super.layoutContainer(parent);

        hsb.setSize(hsb.getWidth() - 100, hsb.getHeight()); // drift
        Point location = hsb.getLocation();
        label.setLocation(location.x + 12, location.y - 12);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I would like to point out that the width of the 'hsb' was not accounted for with the placement of the label. You need to add the width along with the 12. –  user1181445 Apr 25 '12 at 20:19
    
Yes, you are right, but it's not the case, location isn't the problem. Looks like label isn't added at all or it is placed behind other component, so we don't see it. –  Stas Apr 25 '12 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

You might want to consider making your own implementation of JScrollPane. It may sound scary, but in essence all a JScrollPane is is 2 JScrollBars and some graphics logic calling g.translate() If you play around with g.translate you'll see that it's pretty easy to scroll your own stuff.

The advantage of making your own component is that you have full command over layout, display and events. This is the route I would take if I were in your position.

share|improve this answer

Here's my attempt:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.font.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.border.*;

public class Test2 {
  public JComponent makeUI() {
    JPanel myPanel = new JPanel();
    myPanel.add(new JLabel("Check Check Check Check Check Check Check Check"));
    JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(myPanel,
        JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS,
        JScrollPane.HORIZONTAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS);
    JScrollBar hsb = scrollPane.getHorizontalScrollBar();
    hsb.setBorder(new StringBorder(hsb, "Test"));
    JPanel p = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
    p.add(scrollPane);
    return p;
  }
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
      @Override public void run() {
        createAndShowGUI();
      }
    });
  }
  public static void createAndShowGUI() {
    JFrame f = new JFrame();
    f.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    f.getContentPane().add(new Test2().makeUI());
    f.setSize(300, 300);
    f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
    f.setVisible(true);
  }
}
class StringBorder implements Border {
  private final JComponent parent;
  private final Insets insets;
  private final Rectangle rect;
  private final String str;
  public StringBorder(JComponent parent, String str) {
    this.parent = parent;
    this.str = str;
    FontRenderContext frc = new FontRenderContext(null, true, true);
    rect = parent.getFont().getStringBounds(str, frc).getBounds();
    rect.width = Math.max(rect.width, 100);
    insets = new Insets(0,5,0,rect.width);
  }
  @Override public Insets getBorderInsets(Component c) {
    return insets;
  }
  @Override public boolean isBorderOpaque() {
    return false;
  }
  @Override public void paintBorder(
      Component c, Graphics g, int x, int y, int width, int height) {
    Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
    float tx = x + width - insets.right + insets.left;
    float ty = y - rect.y + (height - rect.height)/2;
    g2.setPaint(Color.BLACK);
    g2.drawString(str, tx, ty);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, this is really cool! I have not thought about this way of solving the problem. Is it possible to add near scrollBar a JComponent (JLabel("Text") was just an example of some abstract JComponent)? In reality, I want to add there a JPanel with zoom-in/zoom-out buttons –  Stas Apr 26 '12 at 10:56
    
@Stas Try this link: Component Border « Java Tips Weblog –  aterai Apr 26 '12 at 11:28
    
It helped, thank you again! –  Stas Apr 26 '12 at 12:54

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