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I new to JavaScript/jQuery and I've been learning how to make functions, but a lot of functions have cropped up with (e) in brackets. Let me show you what I mean:

$(this).click(function(e) {
    // does something
}

It always appears that the function doesn't even use the value of (e), so why is it there so often?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

e is the short var reference for event object which will be passed to event handlers.

The event object essentially has lot of interesting methods and properties that can be used in the event handlers.

In the example you have posted is a click handler which is a MouseEvent

$(<element selector>).click(function(e) {
    // does something
    alert(e.type); //will return you click
}

DEMO - Mouse Events DEMO uses e.which and e.type

Some useful references:

http://api.jquery.com/category/events/

http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_properties.html

http://www.javascriptkit.com/jsref/event.shtml

http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/events/index.html

http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Events/#event-types-list

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lol, this almost seems like a silly question, but never the less, it's in the right place., You might want to further you answer with an example of its use compared to regular js (not that there is a dif, but how it's used in jQuery in similarity to js) –  SpYk3HH Apr 25 '12 at 20:45
    
@SpYk3HH Agreed. Planning to do so. –  Vega Apr 25 '12 at 20:46
    
note as Peter Porfy pointed out, it could be any variable name. –  Bart Oct 16 '12 at 17:00

e doesn't have any special meaning. It's just a convention to use e as function parameter name when the parameter is event.

It can be

$(this).click(function(loremipsumdolorsitamet) {
    // does something
}

as well.

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The e argument is short for the event object. For example, you might want to create code for anchors that cancels the default action. To do this you would write something like:

$('a').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
}

This means when an <a> tag is clicked, prevent the default action of the click event.

While you may see it often, it's not something you have to use within the function even though you have specified it as an argument.

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In that example, e is just a parameter for that function, but it's the event object that gets passed in through it.

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It's a reference to the current event object

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