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I've a class that just returns the values in AssemblyInfo.cs (this code is for Windows Phone):

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Reflection;

namespace Tiletoons
{
    class AppInfo
    {
        public static readonly string Id = string.Empty;
        public static readonly string Product = string.Empty;
        public static readonly string Company = string.Empty;
        public static readonly string Version = string.Empty;

        static AppInfo()
        {
            Assembly assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();

            foreach (object attribute in assembly.GetCustomAttributes(false)) {
                if (attribute.GetType() == typeof(GuidAttribute)) {
                    Id = (attribute as GuidAttribute).Value;
                } else if (attribute.GetType() == typeof(AssemblyProductAttribute)) {
                    Product = (attribute as AssemblyProductAttribute).Product;
                } else if (attribute.GetType() == typeof(AssemblyCompanyAttribute)) {
                    Company = (attribute as AssemblyCompanyAttribute).Company;
                } 
            }

            Version = assembly.FullName.Split('=')[1].Split(',')[0];
        }
    }
}

... I'd like to use it to automatically generate my WMAppManifest.xml via T4 Transformations; Here is my ttinclude file:

<#@ assembly name="System.Core" #>
<#@ assembly name="EnvDTE" #>
<#@ import namespace="EnvDTE" #>
<#@ import namespace="System" #>
<# 
IServiceProvider hostServiceProvider = Host as IServiceProvider;
EnvDTE.DTE dte = hostServiceProvider.GetService(typeof(EnvDTE.DTE)) as EnvDTE.DTE;
EnvDTE.ProjectItem containingProjectItem = dte.Solution.FindProjectItem(Host.TemplateFile);
Project project = containingProjectItem.ContainingProject;
var projectName = project.FullName;
ProjectItem deploymentConfiguration = GetProjectItem(project, "AppInfo.cs");

if (deploymentConfiguration == null) {
    throw new Exception("Unable to resolve AppInfo.cs");
}

var codeModel = deploymentConfiguration.FileCodeModel;

string id = null;
string product = null;
string company = null;
string version = null;

foreach (CodeElement codeElement in codeModel.CodeElements) {
    if (codeElement.Name == "AppInfo") {
        CodeClass codeClass = codeElement as CodeClass;

        foreach (CodeElement memberElement in codeClass.Members) {
            CodeVariable variable = memberElement as CodeVariable;

            switch (memberElement.Name) {
                case "Id":
                    id = variable.InitExpression as string;
                    break;
                case "Product":
                    product = variable.InitExpression as string;
                    break;
                case "Company":
                    company = variable.InitExpression as string;
                    break;
                case "Version":
                    version = variable.InitExpression as string;
                    break;
             }
        }
    }
} 
#>
<#+ EnvDTE.ProjectItem GetProjectItem(Project project, string fileName)
{
    foreach (ProjectItem projectItem in project.ProjectItems) {
        if (projectItem.Name.EndsWith(fileName)) {
            return projectItem;
        }

        var item = GetProjectItem(projectItem, fileName);

        if (item != null) {
            return item;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

EnvDTE.ProjectItem GetProjectItem(EnvDTE.ProjectItem projectItem, string fileName)
{
    if (projectItem.ProjectItems != null && projectItem.ProjectItems.Count > 0) {
        foreach (ProjectItem item in projectItem.ProjectItems) {
            if (item.Name.EndsWith(fileName)) {
                return item;
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
} 
#>

... and finally here is my manifest template:

<#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="true" language="C#" #>
<#@ output extension=".xml" #>
<#@ include file="AppInfo.ttinclude" #>
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Deployment xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/windowsphone/2009/deployment" AppPlatformVersion="7.0">
    <App xmlns="" ProductID="<#= id #>" Title="<#= product #>" RuntimeType="XNA" Version="<#= version #>" Genre="apps.games" Author="Gonzo" Description="<#= description #>" Publisher="<#= company #>">
    <IconPath IsRelative="true" IsResource="false">
    ...
  </App>
</Deployment>

Is it possible to fill the manifest template using a class like mine (AppInfo)? I don't want to repeat constants already defined in AssemblyInfo.cs, i.e. the idea would be to peek all the info needed to publish my WP app from there.

Any idea would be really welcome :-)

j3d

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? The manifest is created for you by Visual Studio. What will you gain by generating it using T4? – lysergic-acid Apr 26 '12 at 21:41

Well, I have two different deployment configurations for my app (lite edition or pro edition), and for each configuration i need a specific Guid, title name, version, etc. I was able to solve my problem by modifying WMAppManifest.tt like this:

<#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="true" language="C#" #>
<#@ output extension=".xml" #>
<#@ assembly name="$(TargetPath)" #>
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Deployment xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/windowsphone/2009/deployment" AppPlatformVersion="7.0">
    <App xmlns="" ProductID="<#= AppInfo.Id #>" Title="<#= AppInfo.Product + " " + AppInfo.Edition #>" RuntimeType="XNA" Version="<#= AppInfo.Version #>" Genre="apps.games" Author="Gonzo" Description="<#= AppInfo.Description #>" Publisher="<#= AppInfo.Company #>">
        ...
    </App>
</Deployment>

In the code snippet here above I specified $(TargetPath) in the assembly directive (this points to my compiled assembly in the bin directory) and eventually I was able to peek custom attributes from AssemblyInfo. In this way, I just defines Guids and other needed data only once - here is piece of my AssemblyInfo:

...
#if !LITE_EDITION
[assembly: Guid("716ab9de-f88e-9a14-8d81-65sn67dbf99e")]
[assembly: AssemblyEdition("Pro")]
#else
[assembly: Guid("91e6742f-6273-1a8b-55a69-e70ad5644827")]
[assembly: AssemblyEdition("Lite")]
#endif
...

Depending on the current configuration (e.g. Debug, Debug Lite, Release, Release Lite), I generate an app manifest with the correct info. I hope that helps.

j3d

share|improve this answer
    
Why make a lite and pro edition? Why not just expose the "lite" funtionality while in trial mode? – Richard Szalay Apr 27 '12 at 8:09
    
You are right and I'll remove the Edition attribute and the second GUID... but the mechanism to peek custom attributes (guid, product, version, etc.) from the AssemblyInfo and then automatically generate the manifest does still make sense. I don't like to repeat the same guid here and there. Furthermore, when I release a new version, I have just to modify the version attribute in AssemblyInfo.cs and that's it. Do yo see the point? – j3d Apr 27 '12 at 12:04
    
Because Trial Paid apps get about 1/10 the downloads of Free apps. Having a lite free app, and a trial that is almost the same will drive WAY WAY more downloads. I have tried it with multiple apps. j3d there is no easy way to do this though. – Jason Short Aug 18 '12 at 6:33

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