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In C what is the most efficient way to convert a hexadecimal value to its base 10 value?

For example, if I have 0xFFFFFFFE the result would be 4294967294.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You want strtol. The page explains it well.

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The question was "most efficient way." The OP doesn't specify platform, he could be compiling for a RISC based ATMEL chip with 256 bytes of flash storage for his code.

For the record, and for those (like me), who appreciate the difference between "the easiest way" and the "most efficient way", and who enjoy learning...

static const long hextable[] = {
   [0 ... 255] = -1, // bit aligned access into this table is considerably
   ['0'] = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, // faster for most modern processors,
   ['A'] = 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15,       // for the space conscious, reduce to
   ['a'] = 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15        // signed char.
};

/** 
 * @brief convert a hexidecimal string to a signed long
 * will not produce or process negative numbers except 
 * to signal error.
 * 
 * @param hex without decoration, case insensative. 
 * 
 * @return -1 on error, or result (max sizeof(long)-1 bits)
 */
long hexdec(unsigned const char *hex) {
   long ret = 0; 
   while (*hex && ret >= 0) {
      ret = (ret << 4) | hextable[*hex++];
   }
   return ret; 
}

It requires no external libraries, and it should be blindingly fast. It handles uppercase, lowercase, invalid characters, odd-sized hex input (eg: 0xfff), and the maximum size is limited only by the compiler.

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Am I right in thinking the hextable initialisation code is pseudo-code (if so it's worth pointing that out), or is this some esoteric array initialisation syntax I'm not familiar with? –  therefromhere Nov 7 '12 at 1:02
1  
Compile it and find out! (spoiler: it works) –  davehayden Dec 13 '12 at 4:24
    
It is not compiling with Android ndk-build. –  hB0 Nov 8 '13 at 22:53
    
@hB0 i will respond to that incredibly vague and pointless observation by replying in kind: it compiles fine on clang. there are 22 warnings, but that's to be expected. –  Orwellophile Nov 17 '13 at 14:45
    
I used ndk-build tool in android ndk - developer.android.com/tools/sdk/ndk/index.html and it does not compile gives me error specifically on the array declaration. Though I love the code fragment but I could not use it, so had to use other good method (but inefficient). Cant give you exact compilation error now.. (already gave you +1 last time) –  hB0 Nov 19 '13 at 10:12

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    char s[] = "fffffffe";
    int x;
    sscanf(s, "%x", &x);
    printf("%u\n", x);
}
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If you don't have the stdlib then you have to do it manually.

unsigned long hex2int(char *a, unsigned int len)
{
    int i;
    unsigned long val = 0;

    for(i=0;i<len;i++)
       if(a[i] <= 57)
    	val += (a[i]-48)*(1<<(4*(len-1-i)));
       else
    	val += (a[i]-55)*(1<<(4*(len-1-i)));
    return val;
}

Note: This code assumes uppercase A-F. It does not work if len is beyond your longest integer 32 or 64bits, and there is no error trapping for illegal hex characters.

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a[i]-'0' and a[i]-'A'+10 will also work in the rare case your system is using EBCDIC (they still exist). –  tristopia Nov 5 '12 at 22:35

@Eric

Why is a code solution that works getting voted down? Sure, it's ugly and might not be the fastest way to do it, but it's more instructive that saying "strtol" or "sscanf". If you try it yourself you will learn something about how things happen under the hood.

I don't really think your solution should have been voted down, but my guess as to why it's happening is because it's less practical. The idea with voting is that the "best" answer will float to the top, and while your answer might be more instructive about what happens under the hood (or a way it might happen), it's definitely not the best way to parse hex numbers in a production system.

Again, I don't think there's anything wrong with your answer from an educational standpoint, and I certainly wouldn't (and didn't) vote it down. Don't get discouraged and stop posting just because some people didn't like one of your answers. It happens.

I doubt my answer makes you feel any better about yours being voted down, but I know it's especially not fun when you ask why something's being voted down and no one answers.

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2  
-1 Theres a reason we have comments... –  alternative Oct 29 '10 at 17:05
4  
In August 2008 the site was brand new and comments were not implemented. –  Derek Park Oct 29 '10 at 20:38

For larger Hex strings like in the example I needed to use strtoul.

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Why is a code solution that works getting voted down? Sure, it's ugly ...

Perhaps because as well as being ugly it isn't educational and doesn't work. Also, I suspect that like me, most people don't have the power to edit at present (and judging by the rank needed - never will).

The use of an array can be good for efficiency, but that's not mentioned in this code. It also takes no account of upper and lower case so it does not work for the example supplied in the question. FFFFFFFE

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As if often happens, your question suffers from a serious terminological error/ambiguity. In common speech it usually doesn't matter, but in the context of this specific problem it is critically important.

You see, there's no such thing as "hex value" and "decimal value" (or "hex number" and "decimal number"). "Hex" and "decimal" are properties of representations of values. Meanwhile, values (or numbers) by themselves have no representation, so they can't be "hex" or "decimal". For example, 0xF and 15 in C syntax are two different representations of the same number.

I would guess that your question, the way it is stated, suggests that you need to convert ASCII hex representation of a value (i.e. a string) into a ASCII decimal representation of a value (another string). One way to do that is to us an integer representation as an intermediate one: first, convert ASCII hex representation to an integer of sufficient size (using functions from strto... group, like strtol), then convert the integer into the ASCII decimal representation (using sprintf).

If that's not what you need to do, then you have to clarify your question, since it is impossible to figure it out from the way your question is formulated.

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#include "math.h"
#include "stdio.h"
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//  The bits arg represents the bit say:8,16,32...                                                                                                              
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
volatile long Hex_To_Int(long Hex,char bits)
{
long Hex_2_Int;
char byte;
Hex_2_Int=0;

for(byte=0;byte<bits;byte++)
{
    if(Hex&(0x0001<<byte)) Hex_2_Int+=1*(pow(2,byte));
    else Hex_2_Int+=0*(pow(2,byte));
}
return Hex_2_Int;
}
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//                                                                                                                  
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

void main (void)
{
int Dec;   
char Hex=0xFA;
Dec= Hex_To_Int(Hex,8);  //convert an 8-bis hexadecimal value to a number in base 10
printf("the number is %d",Dec);
}
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The code converts the hexadecemal to it decemal... no complex coding.. simple but works. –  Sunday Efeh Aug 4 '12 at 13:56
1  
My god, this is probably the worst implementation of hex to dec I've ever seen. pow seriously? Know that it is often implemented as pow(a,b) = exp( b * log(a) ). But even if not, converting integer to double is already a heavy operation, especially on modern processors. –  tristopia Nov 5 '12 at 22:32

Try this to Convert from Decimal to Hex

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<conio.h>

    int main(void)
    {
      int count=0,digit,n,i=0;
      int hex[5];
      clrscr();
      printf("enter a number   ");
      scanf("%d",&n);
      if(n<10)
      {
          printf("%d",n);
      }
      switch(n)
      {
          case 10:
              printf("A");
            break;
          case 11:
              printf("B");
            break;
          case 12:
              printf("B");
            break;
          case 13:
              printf("C");
            break;
          case 14:
              printf("D");
            break;
          case 15:
              printf("E");
            break;
          case 16:
              printf("F");
            break;
          default:;
       }

       while(n>16)
       {
          digit=n%16;
          hex[i]=digit;
          i++;
          count++;
          n=n/16;
       }
       hex[i]=n;
       for(i=count;i>=0;i--)
       {
          switch(hex[i])
          {
             case 10:
                 printf("A");
               break;
             case 11:
                 printf("B");
               break;
             case 12:
                 printf("C");
               break;
             case  13:
                 printf("D");
               break;
             case 14:
                 printf("E");
               break;
             case 15:
                 printf("F");
               break;
             default:
                 printf("%d",hex[i]);
          }
    }
    getch();

    return 0;
}
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Consider changing the void main() to int main(void) –  user2045557 Dec 24 '13 at 6:37

@Eric

I was actually hoping to see a C wizard post something really cool, sort of like what I did but less verbose, while still doing it "manually".

Well, I'm no C guru, but here's what I came up with:

unsigned int parseHex(const char * str)
{
    unsigned int val = 0;
    char c;

    while(c = *str++)
    {
        val <<= 4;

        if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
        {
            val += c & 0x0F;
            continue;
        }

        c &= 0xDF;
        if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F')
        {
            val += (c & 0x07) + 9;
            continue;
        }

        errno = EINVAL;
        return 0;
    }

    return val;
}

I originally had more bitmasking going on instead of comparisons, but I seriously doubt bitmasking is any faster than comparison on modern hardware.

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Four complaints: 1) It does not compile. 2) Id does not handle lower case 3) It does not work (A => 1). 4) Invalid characters are just ignored!. Did you test it? –  Loki Astari Sep 26 '08 at 18:35
    
Did you read it? "I didn't actually compile this, so I could have made some pretty big mistakes." So no, I didn't test it. –  Derek Park Sep 26 '08 at 18:46
    
There you go. I patched it up. For the record, it already handled lower case via the "c &= 0xDF" statement. It was broken in multiple other ways, though. –  Derek Park Sep 26 '08 at 19:00
    
Fifth complaint: If you program in ANSI C (and are not guaranteed to have an ASCII-based execution character set), there is no guarantee that 'A' + 1 == 'B' or that ('a' & 0xDF) == ('A' & 0xDF). –  Roland Illig Jun 27 '10 at 16:39

Hexadecimal to decimal. Don't run it on online compilers, because it won't work.

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
    unsigned int i;
    scanf("%x",&i);
    printf("%d",i);
}
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1  
dis will work wid upper nd lower cases both.....i have checked it myself it works.... –  rishabh kedia Nov 26 '11 at 22:23

This currently only works with lower case but its super easy to make it work with both.

cout << "\nEnter a hexadecimal number: ";
cin >> hexNumber;
orighex = hexNumber;

strlength = hexNumber.length();

for (i=0;i<strlength;i++)
{
    hexa = hexNumber.substr(i,1);
    if ((hexa>="0") && (hexa<="9"))
    {
        //cout << "This is a numerical value.\n";
    }
    else
    {
        //cout << "This is a alpabetical value.\n";
        if (hexa=="a"){hexa="10";}
        else if (hexa=="b"){hexa="11";}
        else if (hexa=="c"){hexa="12";}
        else if (hexa=="d"){hexa="13";}
        else if (hexa=="e"){hexa="14";}
        else if (hexa=="f"){hexa="15";}
        else{cout << "INVALID ENTRY! ANSWER WONT BE CORRECT\n";}
    }
    //convert from string to integer

    hx = atoi(hexa.c_str());
    finalhex = finalhex + (hx*pow(16.0,strlength-i-1));
}
cout << "The hexadecimal number: " << orighex << " is " << finalhex << " in decimal.\n";
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