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My architect always says that

Never synchronize on Boolean

I am not able to understand reason why and would really appreciate if someone can explain with example as to why it is not good practice. Reference Sample Code

private Boolean isOn = false;
private String statusMessage = "I'm off";
public void doSomeStuffAndToggleTheThing(){

   // Do some stuff
   synchronized(isOn){
      if(isOn){
         isOn = false;
         statusMessage = "I'm off";
         // Do everything else to turn the thing off
      } else {
         isOn = true;
         statusMessage = "I'm on";
         // Do everything else to turn the thing on
      }
   }
}
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Your example code comes from a blog post explaining why it's bad? theothertomelliott.com/node/40 –  James Montagne Apr 25 '12 at 21:47
    
@JamesMontagne: Yes, but i did not clearly understood the explanation. –  Rachel Apr 25 '12 at 21:48
1  
@Rachel I can certainly understand her or him! There are only two instances of java.lang.Boolean objects in a running JVM, no matter how many Boolean variables you create. This creates a serious aliasing: everyone synchronized on the same pair objects, while their program makes it look like they synchronize on entirely different instances! –  dasblinkenlight Apr 25 '12 at 21:56
1  
@Rachel You synchronize on objects that you intentionally share across threads that need mutual exclusion. You use one synchronization object per logical area that needs synchronization. There may be many such areas - potentially - as many as there are variables used in synchronized blocks in your program. Let's say you have ten areas that need mutual exclusion, so you create ten objects on which you synchronize. However, when your objects are Boolean, all your ten variables will point to only two objects - True and False, so your program will not work as you intended it to. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 25 '12 at 22:08
2  
@dasblinkenlight Also it's one of those rare questions that actually tests some useful knowledge of the interviewee. I've seen several hard to find race conditions where rather experienced programmers violated the general principle behind this - though Java does make that way too easy (synchronizing on this - e.g. nice bug if you also extend a thread instead of using runnable) –  Voo Apr 25 '12 at 22:18
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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Never synchronize on Boolean

You need to synchronize on a constant object. If you synchronized on any object that you are assigning (i.e. changing the object) then the object is not constant and different threads will be synchronizing on different objects. Because they are synchronizing on different objects, multiple threads will be entering the protected block at the same time and race conditions will happen.

synchronized (isOn) {
   if (isOn) {
      // this changes the synchronized object isOn to another object
      isOn = true;

To make matters worse (as @McDowell pointed out in his answer) any Boolean that is created through autoboxing (isOn = true) is the same object as Boolean.TRUE which is a singleton in the ClassLoader across all objects. Your lock object should be local to the class it is used in.

The proper pattern if you need to lock around a boolean is to define a private final lock object:

private final Object lock = new Object();
...

synchronized (lock) {
   ...

Or you should also consider using the AtomicBoolean object which means you may not have to synchronize on it at all.

 private final AtomicBoolean isOn = new AtomicBoolean(false);
 ...

// if it is set to false then set it to true, no synchronization needed
if (isOn.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
    statusMessage = "I'm now on";
} else {
    // it was already on
    statusMessage = "I'm already on";
}

In your case, since it looks like you need to toggle it on/off with threads then you will still need to synchronize on the lock object and set the boolean and avoid the test/set race condition:

synchronized (lock) {
    if (isOn) {
        isOn = false;
        statusMessage = "I'm off";
        // Do everything else to turn the thing off
    } else {
        isOn = true;
        statusMessage = "I'm on";
        // Do everything else to turn the thing on
    }
}

Lastly, if you expect the statusMessage to be accessed from other threads then it should be marked as volatile unless you will synchronize during the get as well.

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So if I do final boolean then it's ok? –  Rachel Apr 25 '12 at 21:47
1  
In the case where you have to do something in both the off and the on case, then yes @Rachel. –  Gray Apr 25 '12 at 21:58
2  
While that's all true and important the answer is missing one very important part: Never synchronize on objects you don't have control over and especially not on singletons that are shared throughout the whole architecture. This will work exactly once, but as soon as someone else has the same idea you've got big problems –  Voo Apr 25 '12 at 22:00
1  
@Gray - IIRC, this usage of AtomicBoolean will not force the synchronization of the statusMessage reference between processor caches unless unless statusMessage is declared volatile. But it would be subject to race conditions in any case. –  McDowell Apr 25 '12 at 22:14
1  
Right @Rachel. That's why there never should be. Locking on a Boolean type is a bug. –  Gray Apr 25 '12 at 22:14
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private Boolean isOn = false;
public void doSomeStuffAndToggleTheThing(){
   synchronized(isOn){

This is a terrible idea. isOn will reference the same object as Boolean.FALSE which is publicly available. If any other piece of badly written code also decides to lock on this object, two completely unrelated transactions will have to wait on each other.

Locks are performed on object instances, not on the variables that reference them:

enter image description here

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Can you give an example of other bad code that would give rise to Deadlock condition –  Rachel Apr 25 '12 at 21:51
1  
Example? Any OTHER code that syncs on a Boolean, even if they call it something else besides isOn. There are only two Boolean objects, so all those threads with be competing with each other. Ouch. –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 25 '12 at 22:00
1  
+1 That's the real problem here. Although I think some more general explanation of why it's a bad idea to sync on objects you don't have complete control over would be even better - doing it on a singleton just makes the problem much more obvious. Edit: Comment and edit to the post were done at the same time, now it's a good bit clearer I think. –  Voo Apr 25 '12 at 22:02
    
+1 I love the picture! You did not draw it to answer this question, did you? –  dasblinkenlight Apr 25 '12 at 22:13
1  
@dasblinkenlight - yuml.me –  McDowell Apr 25 '12 at 22:16
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I think your problem is more with synchronized itself than with sync'ing on Booleans. Imagine that each Thread is a road, where statements (cars) go one after another. At some point there may be an intersection: without a semaphore collisions may happen. The Java language has a built in way to describe this: since any object can be an intersection, any object has an associated monitor acting as a semaphore. When you use synchronized in your code, you are creating a semaphore, thus you must use the same one for all the roads (threads). So this problem is not really boolean-specific because only two Booleans exist, this problem happens every time you synchronize on an instance variable and then point the same variable to a different object. So your code is wrong with Booleans, but is equally dangerous with Integers, Strings and any Object if you don't understand what's going on.

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Edit: Gray's answer is correct.

What I want to add is: Your architect is right, if from perspective of Boolean is immutable, why synchronize it? But multi thread is complex and based on the scenario.

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volatile is not enough because there is a race condition between the set and the get. You need a synchronized block to handle this. Also, Boolean values that are autoboxed are always singletons meaning that you should never synchronize on them. See @McDowell's answer. –  Gray Apr 26 '12 at 12:19
    
@Gray I know what you mean totally. In this senario we should synchronize the logic block. I will correct my English statement. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Apr 26 '12 at 14:18
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