Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a puzzling situation and I would need an expert opinion as to the cause of the phenomenon explained below. A couple of weeks ago, I have conducted a session titled "An overview .NET for Java developers" and as a part of it I wrote a quick class C# (3.5 framework) to read from a file and write to another file line by line (in an iteration). As my audience were java developers, I had the same code in a java class for side by side comparison. However, when I ran these classes on the same machine, to my surprise the java code consistently ran twice as fast than C# code. I have tried many optimizations in C# code to narrow the gap but could not succeed. There has to be an explanation and I am looking for somebody that can explain the cause. I am attaching the source code from both the classes for your reference.


Java class

    public class ReadWriteTextFile {

    static public String getContents(File aFile, String OutPutFileName) {
    StringBuilder contents = new StringBuilder();

    try {
      BufferedReader input =  new BufferedReader(new FileReader(aFile));
      FileReader x = new FileReader(aFile);
      try {
        String line = null;
        while (( line = input.readLine()) != null){
              setContents(OutPutFileName, line + System.getProperty("line.separator"));
        }
      }
      finally {
        input.close();
      }
    }
    catch (IOException ex){
      ex.printStackTrace();
    }

    return contents.toString();
    }

  static public void setContents(String FileName, String aContents)
                                 throws FileNotFoundException, IOException { 
    try {
    	FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter(FileName, true);
    	BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);
    	out.write(aContents);
             out.close();
    } catch (Exception xe) {
    	xe.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
  public static void main (String[] aArguments) throws IOException {

    System.out.println(getDateTime() + ": Started");
    File testFile = new File("C:\\temp\\blah.txt");
         String testFile2 = "C:\\temp\\blahblah.txt";

    for(int i=0; i<100; i++){
         getContents(testFile, testFile2);
     }

    System.out.println(getDateTime() + ": Ended");

  }

  private synchronized static String getDateTime() {
    	DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat(
    									"yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss");
    	Date date = new Date();
    	return dateFormat.format(date);
    }
}


C# class

class ReadWriteTextFile
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(getDateTime() + ": Started");
        String testFile = "C:\\temp\\blah.txt";
        String testFile2 = "C:\\temp\\blahblah.txt";
        for(int i=0; i<100; i++){
            getContents(testFile, testFile2);
        }
        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(getDateTime() + ": Ended");
    }

    static public void getContents(String sourceFile, String targetFile) {      
        try {
            using (StreamReader r = File.OpenText(sourceFile))
            {
                String line;
                while ((line = r.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                    setContents(targetFile, line);
                }
                r.Close();
            }
    }
    catch (IOException ex){
        Console.WriteLine(ex.StackTrace);
    }
  }

  static public void setContents(String targetFile, String aContents)
  {

    try {
        //FileStream fsO = new FileStream(targetFile, FileMode.Append);
        //StreamWriter w = new StreamWriter(fsO);
        FileStream fs = new FileStream(targetFile, FileMode.Append,
                                FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None);
        using (StreamWriter w = new StreamWriter(fs))
        {
            w.WriteLine(aContents + "\n");
        }
    } catch (Exception xe) {
        Console.WriteLine(xe.StackTrace);
    }
  }

  private static String getDateTime() {
      DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
      return dt.ToString("yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss");
   }
}


share|improve this question
1  
Maybe it's a simple case of 'java can do this particular thing faster'. –  karim79 Jun 23 '09 at 13:04
    
Which JDK are you using? Any optimizations turned on? –  duffymo Jun 23 '09 at 13:07
1  
Try re-running the C# version immediately after you ran it. –  C. Ross Jun 23 '09 at 13:08
    
I am hands on and use both C# and Java extensively. I respect both languages and I know the capabilities of C# and I believe C# pretty much can do tasks as efficiently as Java. –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:09
    
I have tried running the C# version immediately assuming that the first time it takes time for JIT. No difference. –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

For one thing: in Java you're using the platform's default encoding. That may well be a fixed "single byte per character" encoding, which is clearly going to be simpler than using UTF-8, which .NET does by default.

In addition, you're writing two newlines in .NET, and only one in Java.

One thing to check is whether you're CPU-bound or IO-bound. I'd expect this to be IO-bound, but I've certainly been surprised before now.

Finally, you should run each test after a reboot to try to remove disk caches from the equation as far as possible.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I turn off the UTF-* encoding in .NET and why do you say I am writing two lines in .NET version???? How do I check if I am CPU bound or IO bound?? –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:15
1  
JS Facts: Jon Skeet left MS and suddenly all C# program ran twice as slow as before :) –  kd304 Jun 23 '09 at 13:18
2  
You're calling WriteLine and adding "\n". Specify the encoding by using the constructor overload for StreamWriter which takes one. Use Encoding.Default to make it work like the Java version. Create a new StreamReader instead of calling File.OpenText - that way you can specify the encoding there too. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 13:19
    
@kd304: I know the gist of your remark was a joke, but in case you were serious at all: I've never worked for MS. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 13:19
1  
@SilverHorse: Yes, that would certainly be a lot faster... but I suspect the point isn't to make it as fast as possible at any cost, but just to find out why basically the same code is faster in Java than .NET. It sounds like it could be that Java is faster at opening files for append, for example. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 16:12

I don't see any code issues here. Some possibilities: you ran the C# code in debug mode perhaps? There was an issue with the file caching. The C# data file operated on a heavily fragmented disk area. I wouldn't expect half speed for such a simple C# program as this.

Edit: I tried both version on a 10439 byte blah.txt. The generated file was 1 043 900 bytes long.

C# (CTRL+F5) time was 18 seconds
C# (F5) time was 22 seconds
Java time was 17 seconds.

Both applications ate about 40% CPU time, half of it was kernel time.

Edit2: The CPU bound is due that the code is constantly opening, closing and writing small chunks of data. This causes a lot of managed-native and user-kernel mode transitions.

My system spec: Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz, 2 GB 800MHz RAM, WinXP SP3

share|improve this answer
    
I ran the C# code in both debug and release mode with similar timings. –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:17
    
By the comment above, do you mean that you ran it have built it with debug and release, or that you ran it in the debugger and not in the debugger? The latter makes much more difference than the former, in my experience. From Visual Studio, hit Ctrl-F5 instead of F5. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 13:26
    
Let me be clear....I ran both by hitting F5(debug) and Ctrl+F5 (run without debugging) –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:36
    
+1 for testing - and basically Java and C# are neck-and-neck when not under a debugger... –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 14:14

The slow part of the benchmarks looks as if it is where a single file is repeatedly opened, decorated, a small write and closed again. Not a useful benchmark. Obvious differences would be how big the buffers are (with a single write, you don't actually need any) and whether the resulting file is synced to disc.

share|improve this answer
    
You know of any simple IO operation bench mark between java and c#, if I need to demonstrate to folks. –  Sai7843 Jun 23 '09 at 13:18
    
Pick something realistic. At the moment your bottleneck may well be opening the file to append to it, which isn't typically the bottleneck in real applications. –  Jon Skeet Jun 23 '09 at 13:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.