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I have this example document:

<html>
    <body>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            document.body.onload = myFunc();

            function myFunc() {
                element = document.getElementById('myDiv');
                element.innerHTML = 'Hello!';
            }
        </script>
        <div id="myDiv"></div>
    </body>
</html>

Why 'element' is null if myFunc is a callback of document.body.onload?

If, instead, the script is inserted after the div, it works:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="myDiv"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            document.body.onload = myFunc();

            function myFunc() {
                element = document.getElementById('myDiv');
                element.innerHTML = 'Hello!';
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

My question is: if I use the onload event within the handler function, should I have the entire DOM, or not? Why should I not?

share|improve this question
    
Although ThiefMaster has pointed out the bug in your code, this might be helpful for you - accessing document.body before DOMContentLoaded might give you errors. So, be aware of that too :) Even jquery checks for existence of document object to confirm that dom is ready for scripts to access. var body = document || document.body || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0] might be helpful if you are to do great stuff in future ;) –  Tamil Apr 26 '12 at 17:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are calling the function immediately (and assign its return value).

Assign the function instead and it will work:

document.body.onload = myFunc;

You should also use var element in your function to avoid creating a global variable.


Or if you want to confuse people:

document.body.onload = myFunc();
function myFunc() {
    return function() {
        var element = document.getElementById('myDiv');
        element.innerHTML = 'Hello!';
    };
}

But let's not do that. It makes no sense here. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
You opened my eyes! LOL Thank you! –  Andrey_ Apr 25 '12 at 21:54

Use this instead

document.body.onload = myFunc;

Or

document.body.onload = function() {
    myFunc();
};
share|improve this answer

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