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I am trying to replicate some modelling I did in Excel, using R. I have read the data from a csv file into a dataframe. The csv file contains two columns of data A and B.

I now want to add additional columns C, D and E to the dataframe and to populate the new columns C, D and E with data generated by applying a formula to the data in the previous columns.

The snippet below should hopefully clarify what I'm trying to do:

       A       B        C                   D              E
1    100.5   101.3
2    102.6   102.5
3    107.2   109.3
4    99.3    89.3
5    102.8   100.7     =(B5-B1)*A5         = C5           = IF(D5 >100,1,-1)
6    107.2   98.9      =(B6-B2)*A6         = C6+C5        = IF(D6 >100,1,-1)
7    99.8    109.9     =(B7-B3)*A7         = C7+C6        = IF(D7 >100,1,-1)
8    108.2   99.5      =(B8-B4)*A8         = C8+C7        = IF(D8 >100,1,-1)
9    78.7    89.6      =(B9-B5)*A9         = C9+C8        = IF(D9 >100,1,-1)
10   108.9   109.2     =(B10-B6)*A10       = C10+C9       = IF(D10 >100,1,-1)

How can I replicate this kind of "columnar" functional programming that Excel (ahem - Excels) in - using R?

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11  
C: diff, D: cumsum, E: ifelse. – Joshua Ulrich Apr 25 '12 at 22:12
3  
@JoshuaUlrich Has given you the answers. From your question, I'd suggest you get your hands on a basic R tutorial and learn the way that R "thinks." It's very much more powerful than Excel, but a different metphor. – Ari B. Friedman Apr 25 '12 at 22:51
    
@gsk3: thats just the problem. I can't seem to find any book that explains/lists the R metaphor or 'R-way' of doing things. Anything I have seen so far, is just a presentation of HOW things are done - not WHY they are done that way (or the thinking behind - and why such an approach was taken). Other languages (e.g. Python) that have a distinctive approach to solving problems, have documentation that explains the reasoning (say the PEP standards). AFAIK, there is nothing like that for R - which makes it very difficult for me to do anything complicated in R. Can you recommend a link/book? – Homunculus Reticulli Apr 26 '12 at 8:06
    
stats.stackexchange.com/questions/138/resources-for-learning-r . In particular, the Intro to R (cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-intro.html) is pretty good. R Inferno is awesome but intermediate-to-advanced (worth skimming early on as it gives you a flavor for good R style though). The R Rosetta Stone Python video might be useful (vcasmo.com/video/drewconway/7183). Art of R (book) looks very good although I haven't read it. Focus on figuring out vectors, lists, functions, and the *apply commands, and I think what is R-like will make sense. – Ari B. Friedman Apr 26 '12 at 12:59
    
@gsk3: thanks for the links – Homunculus Reticulli Apr 26 '12 at 14:12
up vote 9 down vote accepted

My brain is doing this under protest. It makes me feel that I'm back at a Minitab session.

 dfrm$C <- NA
 dfrm$C[5:10] <- with(dfrm, (B[5:10]-B[1:6])*A[5:10])
 dfrm$D <- NA
 dfrm$D[5:10] <- cumsum(dfrm$C[5:10])
 dfrm$E <- NA
 dfrm$E[5:10] <- 1 - 2*(dfrm$D[5:10] <= 100) # could also use ifelse()

dfrm
       A     B       C       D  E
1  100.5 101.3      NA      NA NA
2  102.6 102.5      NA      NA NA
3  107.2 109.3      NA      NA NA
4   99.3  89.3      NA      NA NA
5  102.8 100.7  -61.68  -61.68 -1
6  107.2  98.9 -385.92 -447.60 -1
7   99.8 109.9   59.88 -387.72 -1
8  108.2  99.5 1103.64  715.92  1
9   78.7  89.6 -873.57 -157.65 -1
10 108.9 109.2 1121.67  964.02  1
share|improve this answer
    
the C step could be diff(B, lag=5)*A[5:10] to match Joshua's comment. +1 for minitab! – Justin Apr 25 '12 at 23:36
    
Agree. That would be more "functional". ... at least in form, but have you checked semantics? – 42- Apr 26 '12 at 0:28
    
@DWin: Thanks for the snippet. Judging by your comment - and that of a few others, there is a more 'R-centric' way of doing this. Could you please add a few lines to show the recommended (i.e. 'R' way) of doing this? – Homunculus Reticulli Apr 26 '12 at 10:44
2  
It's a functional language that operates on data objects. In this case you might have specified the problem as: create a new object that draws data from an existing object in a particular manner. It's not so much that R does not do columns well, but rather that R users don't think of the world as a big 2-dimensional piece of paper. – 42- Apr 26 '12 at 13:18
    
@DWin: Hmmm, that still doesn't tell me HOW R users would approach this problem. As you stated yourself, you implemented the solution this way under 'duress' :). So HOW would you have preferred to implement it? – Homunculus Reticulli Apr 26 '12 at 14:25

I created the correct solution below by combining answers provided by both BondedDust and Justin to my solution:

A <- c(100.5, 102.6, 107.2, 99.3, 102.8, 107.2, 99.8, 108.2, 78.7, 108.9)
B <- c(101.3, 102.5, 109.3, 89.3, 100.7, 98.9, 109.9, 99.5, 89.6, 109.2)
dfexcel <- data.frame(A, B, C = rep_len(NA, 10), D = rep_len(NA, 10), E = rep_len(NA, 10))
dfexcel$C[5:10] <- with(dfexcel, diff(B, lag=4)*A[5:10])
dfexcel$D[5:10] <- with(dfexcel, (C[5:10]+c(0,C[5:9]))) # cumsum doesn't work for D
dfexcel$E[5:10] <- ifelse(dfexcel$D[5:10] > 100, 1, -1)

This is the result in LibreOffice Calc/Gnumeric/Microsoft Excel/etc.:

A   B   C   D   E
1   100.5   101.3           
2   102.6   102.5           
3   107.2   09.3            
4   99.3    89.3            
5   102.8   100.7   -61.68  -61.68  -1
6   107.2   98.9    -385.92 -447.6  -1
7   99.8    109.9   59.88   -326.04 -1
8   108.2   99.5    1103.64 1163.52 1
9   78.7    89.6    -873.57 230.07  1
10  108.9   109.2   1121.67 248.1   1
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