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Consider code as follows:

   reg [2:0] cnt;
   // a is an input (say 4 bit) to design and being assigned after some manipulation 
   // to some other variable  

   always @(a)
      for (cnt = 0; cnt < 4; cnt = cnt+1) begin
          //some operation involving a [bitwise]
      end

Now as you can see I didn't include cnt in event list of always block as cnt is not referenced / assigned outside always block and is completely iterated through with for loop

My question is should I have cnt on event list?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way the sensitivity list of the always block works is that once one of the input changes, the always block will execute until it reaches the end, and then it will wait for another change in the sensitivity list.

In your case if you change a, it should run through all 4 loops of your for loop and then finish, so having cnt in the sensitivity list would not be a requirement.

That said, I'm having trouble imagining what kind of logic this is supposed to synthesize to. Is your for loop something that should be clocked, or is it intended to execute instantaneously?

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Thanks @Tim, I would not code it this way. I was verifying someone else's code and was not sure. In any case for loop suppose to create multiple copies of same hardware (it is not clocked and should execute simultaneously). –  wisemonkey Apr 25 '12 at 23:49
    
@wisemonkey In that case I don't think there's anything wrong with the code sample there. –  Tim Apr 25 '12 at 23:54
    
I agree that this looks fine. I would always use @* and avoid missing arguments from sensitivity lists. –  Morgan Apr 26 '12 at 1:18
    
@Munkymorgy: so does it mean cnt will be in event list? if yes then always block will be executed each time cnt is incremented, no? –  wisemonkey Apr 26 '12 at 19:44
    
I do not think so, I have seen this technique used else where and this was not an issue. As far as I can tell the compiler will effectively unroll the for loop, there for the would not trigger unnecessarily. I have added answer with example that you could run to check it out. –  Morgan Apr 27 '12 at 10:51

Adding as answer to allow code examples: Using @* to complete sensitivity lists and checking for unnecessary triggering.

integer cnt;
integer loop_cnt = 0;
reg [3:0] b;

always @* begin
  $display("%t : Loop Count ",$realtime, loop_cnt);
  loop_cnt = loop_cnt + 1;
  for (cnt = 0; cnt < 4; cnt = cnt+1) begin
    b[cnt] = one_bit_data ;
  end
end

Is the same as:

integer cnt;
integer loop_cnt = 0;
reg [3:0] b;

always @( one_bit_data ) begin
  $display("%t : Loop Count ",$realtime, loop_cnt);
  loop_cnt = loop_cnt + 1;
  for (cnt = 0; cnt < 4; cnt = cnt+1) begin
    b[cnt] = clk ;
  end
end

Run both, the time and counts should match up. If there was extra triggering the count would be four times higher.

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