Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm working on the domain model for a recipe application and running into an issue.

The application has multiple entities capable of acting as an ingredient, two of which are: Product and Recipe (recipes can be ingredients in other recipes). Normally I would encapsulate the ingredient-related functionality into an interface that each of these entities can implement. The problem is that, while all Product instances can be ingredients, only a subset of Recipe instances can be ingredients.

interface IIngredient
{
    void DoIngredientStuff();
}

class Product : IIngredient
{
    void DoIngredientStuff()
    {
        // all Products are ingredients - do ingredient stuff at will
    }
}

class Recipe : IIngredient
{
    public IEnumerable<IIngredient> Ingredients { get; set; }

    void DoIngredientStuff()
    {
        // not all Recipes are ingredients - this might be an illegal call
    }
}

How can I restructure this model to support the requirement that only some Recipe instances should be capable of acting as an ingredient?

share|improve this question
2  
to figure out nice answer, we need to understand why exactly all recipes can't act as ingredients – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another option if it works in your classes tree to have separate classes for these 2 types of Recipes. Note that this approach does not work well if there more properties you want to distinguish objects by.

class Recipe {
    public IEnumerable<IIngredient> Ingredients { get; set; }

}

class UsefulRecipe : Recipe, IIngredient
{
    void DoIngredientStuff()
    {
        // not all Recipes are ingredients - this might be an illegal call
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
SmartRecipe, UsefulRecipe, RecipeWithOnlyFiveInstructions, RecipeThatCanBeOnlyFiveYearsOld, MyGrandmasHalfHundredYearOldRecipeOfExtraTastyPancakesThatWeAteLastNewYearEve – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:42
    
I tried to write in my answer, but it was on second line and ... Feel free to edit answer if you have better way to say it. – Alexei Levenkov May 3 '12 at 18:52

Sounds like a design issue to me. If you have to start doing testing for IsIngredient I think you have gone wrong with your design. What happens when you have another special case condition? And then another? Are you going to keep adding special If tests or a big switch statement? That breaks the Open-Closed principle.

How about Favoring Composition over Inheritance? You might want to also look at the Strategy Pattern...

Really the core issue here is that Recipe should not be implementing IIngredient...cause not all Recipes implement the IIngredient behavior...

share|improve this answer
interface IIngredient 
{ 
    bool IsIngredient { get; }
    void DoIngredientStuff(); 
} 

class Recipe : IIngredient 
{ 
    public IEnumerable<IIngredient> Ingredients { get; set; } 

    bool IsIngredient {
       get { return true; // true if it is, false if it isn't }
    }   

    void DoIngredientStuff() 
    { 
      if (IsIngredient) {
        // do whatever
      }
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
That will work...but its a flawed and non-extensible design. It will require a refactor each time a new special condition needs to be added to the design. – MrLane Apr 25 '12 at 23:33
1  
I don't think it is flawed. This is the approach used by the .NET System.IO.Stream library. Some stream support reading, some don't and this is conveyed via boolean property. In your case, some recipes are ingredients, some aren't and this is one of the simplest ways to express that. Furthermore, if these entities are to be persisted, it is easier to avoid polymorphic approaches instead opting for storing a bit field with each recipe to indicate if it can be used as an ingredient. – eulerfx Apr 26 '12 at 4:57
    
It is flawed. Principle of least astonishment is violated (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_least_astonishment). If it's an ingredient, it MUST be able to DoIngredientStuff. Otherwise - what's the point of interface that enforces it? – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:38
    
@eulerfx .NET framework is full with ugly code yourlogicalfallacyis.com/appeal-to-authority – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:39
    
i don't think it is a fallacy to reference the stream library as an example. if going by that token however, don't u think both of your references are examples of the appeal-to-authority fallacy? – eulerfx May 3 '12 at 18:09

I would perhaps use composition to create a CompositeRecipe that can combine 2 (maybe more) recipes. What is the reasoning for not having all recipes capable of being used as the base for new recipes? You could always add a boolean property to suggest that the recipe is a complete recipe (IsCompleteRecipe) and then it would be up to how you build the app and the application logic to determine if the recipe should be combinable with others.

share|improve this answer
    
Composing recipes would not fix issue that not all recipes are ingredients – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:45

If only some Recipes are Ingredients, then it seems a classic case for inheritance, with IIngredient being implemented on the subclass:

class Product : IIngredient
{
    void DoIngredientStuff();
}

class Recipe
{
    public IEnumerable<IIngredient> Ingredients { get; set; }
}

class IngredientRecipe : Recipe, IIngredient
{
    void DoIngredientStuff();
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is not about recipes of ingredients, it is about some recipes that can act as ingredients. There's a huge difference. – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:53
    
In this design, IngredientRecipe is precisely that: a Recipe that can act as an ingredient. Not sure I understand what "recipes of ingredients" are. – Dan May 3 '12 at 11:34
    
i don't know either. it's ambiguous naming. you see it as a specialized recipe that can act as ingredient, i see it as a recipe of ingredient. anyway - yours answer is same as stackoverflow.com/a/10325249/82062 – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 12:51

You could use an adaptor to make a recipe behave as an ingredient:

class RecipeIngredient : IIngredient
{
    private readonly Recipe _recipe;

    public RecipeIngredient(Recipe recipe) {
        _recipe = recipe;
    }

    public void DoIngredientStuff() {
        // Do stuff with the recipe.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think adapters should be used only when you have no control over adaptable thing – Arnis L. May 3 '12 at 8:43
    
I think it's a suitable pattern to use in this situation. It avoids Recipes having to know if they can be Ingredients but allows any Recipe to be an Ingredient when required. How would you approach the problem? – Andrew Kennan May 3 '12 at 23:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.