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So I am having trouble implementing the mtime struct in C, where I am trying to check the last modification time of a file. When compiling, I receive this error:

pr8.1.c:246: error: incompatible types when assigning to type struct timespec from type time_t make: *** [pr8] Error 1

The code I am using for this is as follows:

static struct timespec mtime(const char *file)
{
    struct stat s;
    struct timespec t = { 0, 0 };

    if (stat(file, &s) == 0)
#if     defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 1    // Linux
    { t = s.st_mtime; }
#elif   defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 2    // Mac OS X
    { t = s.st_mtimespec; }
#elif   defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 3    // Mac OS X, with some additional settings
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtime; t.tv_nsec = s.st_mtimensec; }
#else                                   // Solaris
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtime; }
#endif

    return t;
}

And the struct stat:

struct stat
{ time_t        st_mtime; };

P.S. sorry about the format, I am not sure why the format is acting like this. Running this with Linux. Thanks in advance for the help.

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As a hint, take a look at what the other cases are doing and compare to the struct stat snippet you showed. (One of them is already doing the right thing.) –  geekosaur Apr 25 '12 at 23:49
    
I think I understand your point, however if I remove the stuct stat I get a compile time error that the storage size of "s" is not initialized, I figured I needed the struct stat for this reason? –  joethecoder Apr 25 '12 at 23:56
    
No, you did not understand my point. Consider what the other cases are doing, compared to the type of st_mtime you quoted. –  geekosaur Apr 25 '12 at 23:57
    
I realize from the bottom response what you had meant now, thanks for the reply. I didn't think it was required for Linux and that version of Mac OS. –  joethecoder Apr 26 '12 at 0:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the linux and first mac os x version, you're assigning to the structure from an int (time_t). In the other two versions, you are correctly assigning from a member of s to a member of t. If you change to this, do you get correct operation?

static struct timespec mtime(const char *file)
{
    struct stat s;
    struct timespec t = { 0, 0 };

    if (stat(file, &s) == 0)
#if     defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 1    // Linux
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtime; }
//     ^^^^^^^ 
#elif   defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 2    // Mac OS X
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtimespec; }
//     ^^^^^^^ 
#elif   defined(MTIME) && MTIME == 3    // Mac OS X, with some additional settings
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtime; t.tv_nsec = s.st_mtimensec; }
#else                                   // Solaris
    { t.tv_sec = s.st_mtime; }
#endif

    return t;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do thank you, although I'm not sure I quite understand why. –  joethecoder Apr 26 '12 at 0:04

The compiler told you the types are incompatible, and they obviously are.

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