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let me start by saying i am pretty new to the whole struct and union thing. i have done my homework before posting this and honestly trying to get legitimate clarification. if this is the wrong way to this please let me know. first off, i am attempted to create a union because i am combining different data types. my only real problem / question is the dot operator vs the ->. i can get what i want working using the

->

but not the

.

im just curious as to why? iv read a bunch of posts on stack that show examples or "answers" using the ".", but no luck in the real world. i have played with "typedef" like...

typedef union _myUnion
{
     int intValue;
     bool boolValue;
}myUnion;

but that doesn't seam to make a difference. if anyone explain what im doing wrong it would be greatly appreciated. here is a quick sample of what i am trying to do. for the sake of simplicity, i will just post some struct/union syntax and wont add any of the sub-classing code since that's not an issue.

example.h

#import "<Foundation/Foundation.h"

union myUnion
{
   int intValue;
   bool boolValue;
};

@interface MyClass : NSObject
{
    union myUnion *someProperty;
}

@property (nonatomic, assign) union myUnion *someProperty;

-(void)doSomething;

@end

example.m

#import "MyClass.h"

@implementation MyClass

@synthesize someProperty = _someProperty;

- (id)init
{
//Some init method...
}

- (void)doSomething
{
    NSLog(@"I Did Something...");
}

@end

so now in my other class this works...

MyClass *newObject = [MyClass alloc] init];
newObject.someProperty->intValue = 6;

but this doesn't...

MyClass *newObject = [MyClass alloc] init];
newObject.someProperty.intValue = 6;

at this point in time i'm more interested in learning why that latter doesn't work? what's interesting is if i take off the pointer in the .h file for the property.

@interface MyClass : NSObject
    {
        union myUnion someProperty;
    }

@property (nonatomic, assign) union myUnion someProperty;

the "." works instead of the "->", but now its not assignable.

as a side note, if i change the bool to an int and make it a struct the same thing happens. unfortunately i became proficient at objective-c first and am slowly picking up strict c as i go. so my understanding of c is a tad weak, but that's the beauty of obc, i get to learn two languages for the price of one! if you don't count open-gl.

i would ask, if someone could post a working example of code and i can then figure out what i did wrong, or explain thoroughly what it is i am doing wrong and some of the fundamental concepts i missed. from there i can figure out how to write my own working code. i don't need both, and don't expect a hand out but would like to learn so i can solve my own problems and not just patch buggy code without understanding how or why it works.

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2 Answers

The a->b operator is shorthand for (*a).b - it's like using the . but doing a dereference first. It's appropriate when a is a pointer.

Since in your original example someProperty is a pointer to a union, you'll need to dereference that pointer first. This means you'll need to either use:

(*newObject.someProperty).intValue // confusing!

Or

newObject.someProperty->intValue // much better

to access it.

Of course, once you've changed someProperty to be a union instead of a pointer to a union, you can use the . instead. So:

  • a->b: Accesses a struct/union member on a pointer
  • a.b: Accesses a struct/union member on a raw struct/union
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In this case, it's quite probable that you want the union as a value -- not a pointer to an external memory location:

@interface MyClass : NSObject
{
    union myUnion someProperty; // << no '*'
}

@end

then you use the period for member access:

someProperty.intValue = 6;

and if it were a pointer:

someProperty->intValue = 6;

However, there's another issue. You have two (primary) options to use the union as a property. Value or pointer. This is commonly handled by value, especially when all fields refer to memory local to the structure/union, and when the field id not large. In this case, you would often return and set by value. This means that your program would be written as follows:

@interface MyClass : NSObject
{
    union myUnion someProperty;
}

@property (nonatomic, assign) union myUnion someProperty; // << by value

@end

then the client may access and set it by value, like so:

union myUnion p = obj.someProperty;
++p.intValue;
obj.someProperty = p;

and that's how it's often accomplished with small structures which don't refer to shared resources.

Of course, you will not need a copy when your instance has direct access to it, should you choose to access the field directly:

- (void)doSomething
{
  ++someProperty.intValue;
}

if this becomes complex, it's likely a good idea to abstract the data behind methods, and leave accessing and mutation to the instance of MyClass which holds the union.

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the answers provided by you and timothy are wonderfully stated. thank you both. if i could ask a followup question. let's i was creating the ubiquitous "person" class. that "person" has a property of "hair". that hair has a "length" & "color". so if i wanted to set person.hair.color = black; & person.hair.length = long; would a struct be the right way to go, or should i be looking at doing this a different way? i guess i am trying to figure out is how to create "sub properties", then set and get those. –  DoS Apr 26 '12 at 2:10
    
@DoS for nontrivial behaviors and data, you'd typically just use an objc class, rather than a plain c struct or union. with experience, you'll be able to choose objc class, c struct, or other appropriate design quite easily. –  justin Apr 26 '12 at 2:24
    
thanks again for the info. but to your point i am just trying to learn different methodologies for doing things. "broadening my horizons" so to speak. i know i could do this with a pure o-c class but was curious how else it could be done. i guess i am still a bit confused on my pseudo "sub property" question or syntax. using the "person" class example, you're basically saying "hair" would just be a sub-class of the "person" class. "length" & "color" would then just be properties of the hair sub-class? am i understanding that correctly? –  DoS Apr 26 '12 at 2:55
    
@DoS it ultimately depends on the complexity and the behavior. one structure (c struct or objc class) is typically more favorable for a given task or implementation. in the case of the person, you may ultimately find that hair.length is most easily expressed using a c type, but hair has multiple properties, and it may have implementation or polymorphic behavior needed to represent hair as an object, so hair as a more complex representation, may be better suited to a class, while a int may be used for length, and an NSColor or UIColor may be used for the color property. (cont) –  justin Apr 26 '12 at 3:38
    
(cont) but many objc devs don't take c to its limits wrt ood, unless performance or portability is a concern. they just use objc types when it's easier to represent something as an objc type (or collection, or…). –  justin Apr 26 '12 at 3:39
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