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I'm trying to create variabels on the fly in a for loop. error. What I'm trying to do is: get the values of 32 text fields and trying to store those values into a variable.

for (i = 1; i<=32;i++){
   q[i] = document.getElementById('qty[i]').value;
}

But this yeilds:

Error: 'q' is undefined

share|improve this question
    
always be careful of doing document.getElementById().value directly. If that id doesnt exist, then the object returned is usually null, and you cant take value of null. This will also break your script. – Thomas Jones Apr 26 '12 at 0:36
var q = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){
    q[i] = document.getElementById('qty[i]').value;
}

q will contain all of your values. You should declare the array q outside of your for loop, as that's the commonly accepted best practice. If you don't declare q at all, it will be come an implied global variable, something that you probably want to avoid. If you declare q inside your loop, it will get overridden each iteration, so you need to make sure you declare it outside.

Also, you'll note that I changed your for loop from this:

for(i = 1; i <= 32; i++) {

To this:

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){

You're looping from 1 to 32; this is incorrect, as arrays in Javascript are 0-indexed; in other words, they start counting from zero. Since this is the case, your for loops also need to start counting at zero, and end at 31. Also, you'll want to declare the var i in your for loop; otherwise, it will become a global variable.


Now, if you really really didn't want to declare q outside of your for loop, you could do what Kirian demonstrated; that is, use an if statement to determine if q has already been declared, and if not, declare it. That would look like this:

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){
    if(!q) q = [];
    q[i] = document.getElementById('qty[i]').value;
}

And another note, if qty is an array in your code then you probably want this instead:

var q = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){
    q[i] = document.getElementById(qty[i]).value;
}

If instead qty is part of a set of IDs that look like qty[1], qty[2], qty[3]..., then you want this:

var q = [];

for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){
    q[i] = document.getElementById('qty[' + i + ']').value;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is completely false. JavaScript does not have block scope. JavaScript has only function scope and global scope. Declaring a variable within a for loop is completely valid and the variable will be available outside that loop just fine. It is bad practice and confusing though. – Thomas Jones Apr 26 '12 at 0:26
    
Oh, really? I didn't know that, thanks for the catch. – Elliot Bonneville Apr 26 '12 at 0:28
    
Yep. It's confusing as hell to programmers trained in higher level languages, but true, – Thomas Jones Apr 26 '12 at 0:28
    
Huh. Editing to correct, thanks again. – Elliot Bonneville Apr 26 '12 at 0:29
    
jsfiddle.net/qUhMK/1 – Thomas Jones Apr 26 '12 at 0:30

Have you tried:

var q = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 32; i++){
  q.push(document.getElementById('qty[i]').value);
}

The syntax q.push(x) appends x to the end of an array.

share|improve this answer
    
Just out of curiosity, why are you using q.push? q[i] works just fine. – Elliot Bonneville Apr 26 '12 at 0:31
    
q[i] in this scenario will work fine, but be careful with just doing indexes. They will get you arrays of odd sizes, as javascript will initialize the array up to the index you specified, with each element being undefined. jsfiddle.net/uNwSA q.push is a better practice, and object oriented, unless the indexes are important. – Thomas Jones Apr 26 '12 at 0:35
    
I'm aware of that. I was just wondering why he's using push() in this case as q[i] will work fine and is probably faster. – Elliot Bonneville Apr 26 '12 at 0:41
    
@Kirean While I agree on the use of push, what you said is not entirely accurate. length is just a special property that is equal to the highest index plus 1. Arrays in JavaScript are sparsely populated, so those other indices are just undefined, not initialized. – Dennis Apr 26 '12 at 0:47
1  
It's because of the size of the key - 9000 is four characters, 8 is 1 character. (4-1)*2 accounts for the size byte difference in the calculation. – Dennis Apr 26 '12 at 10:25

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