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I'm trying to use inheritance so that I can perform the code contained within the test class correctly. I'm unsure how to implement an abstract class or interface called Bathroom featuring the goPee() method. Do you know how to code it?

If I add either an abstract class or an interface and add them to the Human class via extends or implements respectively, I am always asked to write implementation in the Human class for goPee() method, which i don't want to do, as my goPee() method implementation is written in the Male and Female child classes.

import java.util.ArrayList;

class Human
{
  private String name;
  public Human (String name)
  {
    this.name = name;
  }
  public String getName()
  {
    return name;
  }
  public void eat()
  {
    System.out.println(name + " went to fridge.");
  }
}

class Male extends Human
{
  public Male(String name)
  {
    super(name);
  }
  public void goPee()
  {
    System.out.println(getName() + " stood up.");
  }
}

class Female extends Human
{
  public Female(String name)
  {
    super(name);
  }
  public void goPee()
  {
    System.out.println(getName() + " sat down.");
  }
}

public class TestHuman
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    ArrayList<Human> arr = new ArrayList<Human>();
    arr.add(new Male("john"));
    arr.add(new Female("sally"));
    for (int count = 0; count < arr.size(); count++)
    {
      arr.get(count).eat();
      arr.get(count).goPee();
    }
  }
}
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I do know how to code it. What have you tried? What are your thoughts? –  Jeffrey Apr 26 '12 at 1:34
15  
Well +1 for getting me to look at the question. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 26 '12 at 1:35
    
All your code knows is that you are dealing with a list that contains Human objects. Therefore, you are allowed to deal with members of Human. Your desired method is not on Human. See the issue? –  Anthony Pegram Apr 26 '12 at 1:35
1  
Make the children goPee! –  Scott W Apr 26 '12 at 1:37
    
I have a massive desire to know what this application is doing. –  Zane May 23 '13 at 17:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You must define a goPee() method in the Human class. Since you're overriding it in both subclasses, it can be an abstract method. This also means that Human must be abstract.

abstract class Human
{
  private String name;
  public Human (String name)
  {
    this.name = name;
  }
  public String getName()
  {
    return name;
      }
  public void eat()
  {
    System.out.println(name + " went to fridge.");
  }
  public abstract void goPee();
}

Declaring an abstract method in Human ensures that all subclasses of Human implement the goPee() method with the same parameters and return type. This allows you to call goPee() on a Human without knowing whether it is a Male or Female, since you know both implement it.

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In order to be able to call method of subclasses polymorphically, you need to define a method with the same signature in the base class.

abstract class Human {
    public abstract void goPee();
}

You do not need to make the class abstract, but in this case it makes sense to do so, because there are no genderless humans. However, if you would like to share some implementation among methods of derived classes, you could put common code in the base class implementation:

class Human {
    public void goPee() {
        System.out.println(getName() + " lifted the cover.");
    }
}

class Male extends Human {
    public void goPee() {
        super.goPee();
        System.out.println(getName() + " stood up.");
    }
}

class Female extends Human {
    public void goPee() {
        super.goPee();
        System.out.println(getName() + " sat down.");
    }
}
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I'm pretty sure if you have an abstract method in a class, javac will throw an error unless the class is also abstract. –  MALfunction84 Apr 26 '12 at 1:40
    
@MALfunction84 Of course javac will report an error if an abstract method is found in a non-abstract class. But you do not necessarily need to make the method abstract either (I updated the answer to illustrate this point). –  dasblinkenlight Apr 26 '12 at 1:43

Your fundamental issue is that your trying to call a method on a Human reference that does not exist.

If you cast the the object correctly to a Male or Female object, then you would find that you could call the method. Since your container only knows about your base class, you would need to define the method there, and then polymorphism would call the correct definition in the type tied to the Human reference. (i.e. a Male or Female object)

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