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What I want to do is to execute a method on one of various objects, but before and after the method call, I need to execute functions to do various maintenance tasks. The functions to run before and after are always the same. The method's return type and parameters can be almost anything.

Currently, I'm doing this by defining delegates for every possible method signature that I'm using, and it's getting stupendously awkward to do. This is one example:

protected delegate void DelVoidString(string string1);
protected void Execute(DelVoidString p, string string1)
{
    PreInvoke();
    p.Invoke(string1);
    PostInvoke();
}

Other than the signatures, the code on all of them is identical. So my question is: is there a better way of doing this? I'm not attached to using delegates, just as long as I have some means of executing PreInvoke() and PostInvoke() before and after those method calls that need them, without having to remember to write out that code every single time.

I have only a vague knowledge of Lambda expressions...can they help me out better here? Or am I missing something else stupendously obvious? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use generics and the built-in System.Action delegate types to reduce some of the duplication:

protected void Execute(Action action)
{
    PreInvoke();
    action();
    PostInvoke();
}

protected void Execute<T>(Action<T> action, T arg)
{
    PreInvoke();
    action(arg);
    PostInvoke();
}

protected void Execute<T1, T2>(Action<T1, T2> action, T1 arg1, T2 arg2)
{
    PreInvoke();
    action(arg1, arg2);
    PostInvoke();
}

// Additional methods for three arguments, four arguments, etc.

To handle return values, use System.Func:

protected TResult Execute<TResult>(Func<TResult> func)
{
    PreInvoke();
    TResult result = func();
    PostInvoke();
    return result;
}

protected TResult Execute<T, TResult>(Func<T, TResult> func, T arg)
{
    PreInvoke();
    TResult result = func(arg);
    PostInvoke();
    return result;
}

You might also want to look into aspect-oriented programming (AOP) for C#.

share|improve this answer
    
Generic Actions will definitely decrease the code somewhat. I wasn't aware they could be generic. There are a few cases where the return value isn't void, but those are few and far between. Another one I found just after I posted: what about Delegate.DynamicInvoke? Speed is not a concern, so would that be a possibility? –  RobinHood70 Apr 26 '12 at 4:11
    
I updated my answer to handle return values. Delegate.DynamicInvoke is a possibility, but the compiler would not be able to warn you if you passed an incorrect number of arguments. –  Michael Liu Apr 26 '12 at 4:15
    
Thanks, I think with your changes, that's probably the best choice. –  RobinHood70 Apr 26 '12 at 4:22

Providing a variation on the theme others have offered - you might consider making a generic abstract base class and inheriting from it like so:

public abstract class Executable<T>
{
    protected void Execute(Action<T> action, T value)
    {
        PreInvoke();
        action();
        PostInvoke();
    }
    private void PreInvoke() { /* something */ }
    private void PostInvoke() { /* something */ }
}

public MyFooExecutable : Executable<string>
{
}

This kind of implementation closes the generic type to string on the MyFooExecutable class. This would allow you to have other subclasses that vary the type without leaving the type open for all kinds of T's. Depending on what your Pre/Post-Invoke methods do, you might even get away with putting these into extension methods instead and coding to an interface:

public interface IInvocable
{
   void PreInvoke();
   void PostInvoke();
}

public class MyFooExecutable : IInvocable
{
    public void PreInvoke() { /* something */ }
    public void PostInvoke() { /* something */ }
}

public static class InvocableExtensions
{
    public static void Execute<T>(this IInvocable self, Action<T> action, T value)
    {
        self.PreInvoke();
        action(value);
        self.PostInvoke();
    }
}
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if you need this pre/post invoke mechanism for a lot of methods, i think you should consider using AOP tool for .net like PostSharp.

You can see an exmaple of using the PostSharp's OnMethodBoundaryAspect in Dror Helper blog or in the PostSharp site under Examples

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