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I can't figure this out. When I compile this code on my Windows machine with Code::Blocks it works just fine but when I try to compile it with Make under Cygwin or an actual Unix machine at school I get the weird behavior below. I am passing in "client1.txt" to translate().

void translate(char* filepath){

  char output_filepath[181];
  strcpy(output_filepath, filepath);
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);      //this prints out "client1.txt" which is correct
  char* ptr = strcat(output_filepath, ".translated");
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);      //this prints out ".translated" which is wrong
    printf("%s\n", ptr);                  //also prints out ".translated" wrong again

...more stuff...
}

This leads to a segmentation fault when trying to use fgets on output_filepath. Does anyone know what is going on? Do I need to explain more? It must be able to compile under Unix.

Here is the whole program, I hope it isn't too long. It is a program my teacher gave us to work on but I can't even get it to run. It just gives me a segmentation fault and I had tracked it down the the section above.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>

struct tparam{
int tid;
};

int NTHREADS  =  5;
#define LOOPS         10000
int qfilled = 0;
int qin = 0;
int qout = 0;
char queue[3000][2][161];
char dic[7000][2][161];
int dic_size = 0;
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;
pthread_mutex_t flag_mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

char * dummystatus[10];

char * lookup(char * word)
{
int i;
for(i = 0; i < dic_size; ++i)
{
    if(strcmp(word, dic[i][0])==0)
        return dic[i][1];
}
return word;
}
void translate(char filepath[])
{
char output_filepath[181];
strcpy(output_filepath, filepath);
strcat(output_filepath, ".translated");

FILE * client_file = fopen(filepath,"r");
FILE * translated_client_file = fopen(output_filepath,"w");
char line [161];
char * tmpPtr;
char * token;
while((tmpPtr=fgets(line, 160, client_file))!= NULL) {
    if(strcmp(line,"\n") == 0 || line == NULL)
        continue;
    token = strtok_r(line, " \t\n", dummystatus);

    while(token != NULL && strcmp(token,"\n") != 0){
        fputs(lookup(token), translated_client_file);
        fputs(" ", translated_client_file);
        token = strtok_r(NULL, " \t\n", dummystatus);
    }
    fputs("\n", translated_client_file);
}
fclose(client_file);
}
void *do_work(void * p) {
  struct tparam * param = (struct tparam *)p;

  while(qfilled != 1);//wait for queue to be filled

  int cindex;
  while(1){
      //check for more clients
  pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
  if(qout >= qin){
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    break;
  }
  //process client
  cindex = qout;
  printf("Thread %d is handling client %s\n",param->tid, queue[cindex][1]);
  qout++;
  pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);

  char filepath[161];
  if(queue[cindex][0][strlen(queue[cindex][0])-1] == '\n')
      strncpy(filepath,queue[cindex][0],strlen(queue[cindex][0])-1);
  else
    strcpy(filepath,queue[cindex][0]);
  translate(filepath);
  printf("Thread %d finished handling client %s\n",param->tid, queue[cindex][1]);

      //usleep(rand()%100000+10000);
  }
  pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void addDicEntry(char line[]){
char * first = strtok_r(line, " \t", dummystatus);
char * second = strtok_r(NULL, " \t", dummystatus);
char englishWord[161];
if(1==1 || second != NULL)
{
    strcpy(dic[dic_size][0], first);
    strncpy(englishWord, second, strlen(second)-1);
    englishWord[strlen(second)-1] = '\0';
    strcpy(dic[dic_size][1], englishWord);
    dic_size++;
}
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

srand(time(NULL));
  if(argc < 2){
printf("No dictionary file provided\n");
exit(1);
  }
  //read dictionary
  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
dummystatus[i] = (char*)malloc(10);

  FILE * dic_file = fopen(argv[1],"r");
  if(dic_file == NULL)
 {
printf("Dictionary file does not exist\n");
exit(1);
  }
  char line [161];
  char * tmpPtr;
  while((tmpPtr=fgets(line, 160, dic_file))!= NULL) {
if(strcmp(line,"\n") == 0 || strcmp(line,"") == 0 || line == NULL)
    break;
addDicEntry(line);
  }
  fclose(dic_file);
  //End read dictionary

  //Creating threads
  if(argc >= 3)
NTHREADS = atoi(argv[2]);

  pthread_t * threads = (pthread_t *)malloc(NTHREADS*sizeof(pthread_t));
  pthread_attr_t attr;

  pthread_attr_init(&attr);
  pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE);
  for (i=0; i<NTHREADS; i++) {
struct tparam * param = (struct tparam *)malloc(sizeof(struct tparam *)*1);
param->tid = i+1;
//printf("Thread %d is being created\n",param->tid);
pthread_create(&threads[i], &attr, &do_work, param);
  }
 //End creating threads

  //insert clients in Q
  FILE * clients_file = fopen("clients.in","r");

  char cid_str[10];
  while((tmpPtr=fgets(line, 160, clients_file))!= NULL) {
if(strcmp(line,"\n") == 0 || strcmp(line,"") == 0 || line == NULL)
    break;
pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
strcpy(queue[qin][0],line);
sprintf(cid_str, "%d", qin+1);
strcpy(queue[qin][1],cid_str);
qin++;
pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
  }
  fclose(clients_file);
//for (i=0; i<qin; i++)
//printf("%s\n", queue[i][0]);
  qfilled = 1;
  printf("Q Filled\n");
  //End insert clients in Q

  //printf("Waiting for Threads\n");
  for (i=0; i<NTHREADS; i++)
pthread_join(threads[i], NULL);
  //printf("Threads Finished\n");

  pthread_attr_destroy(&attr);
  pthread_exit(NULL);
}
share|improve this question
    
We just tested this with gcc under Unix here and it works fine. Perhaps you could provide a little more context/info? –  Brendon Cheves Apr 26 '12 at 4:19
    
So let me get this straight, the output is: "client1.txt\n.translated\n.translated", but should be "client1.txt\nclient1.txt.translated\nclient1.txt.translated" ? The latter is what I get. It kind of sounds like it's calling strcpy instead of strcat, in your case. –  Edmund Apr 26 '12 at 4:23
    
I'd like to point out that, in your do_work function (I'll ignore that extremely descriptive name for now...) you're using strncpy as a bounded strcpy, which it really isn't since it isn't guaranteed to nul-terminate the string. This has the potential to create some bothersome corner cases, which probably aren't the bug here, but you should still consider not using it. –  Chris Lutz Apr 26 '12 at 4:38
    
"I hope it isn't too long"; I would say yes it is. –  smocking Apr 26 '12 at 4:56
1  
Try using a tool like valgrind to check for memory errors. –  jbleners Apr 26 '12 at 5:00

3 Answers 3

I suspect that the problem is more subtle than 'overwriting your string'; it is more a question of overwriting the data on the output line. Try this code:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void translate(char* filepath)
{
  char output_filepath[181];

  strcpy(output_filepath, filepath);
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);      //this prints out "client1.txt" which is correct
  char* ptr = strcat(output_filepath, ".translated");
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);      //this prints out ".translated" which is wrong
    printf("%s\n", ptr);                  //also prints out ".translated" wrong again
}

int main(void)
{
    translate("client1.txt\r");
    return(0);
}

Output on Mac OS X 10.7.3:

client1.txt
.translated
.translated

You've got a carriage return at the end of the file path argument string which leads to this apparent conundrum.

You can feed the output from the program through od or hd or a similar program. Mine's called odx, but anything will do (and your program got called x39 for no good reason at all except it was a new file name):

$ ./x39 | odx
0x0000: 63 6C 69 65 6E 74 31 2E 74 78 74 0D 0A 63 6C 69   client1.txt..cli
0x0010: 65 6E 74 31 2E 74 78 74 0D 2E 74 72 61 6E 73 6C   ent1.txt..transl
0x0020: 61 74 65 64 0A 63 6C 69 65 6E 74 31 2E 74 78 74   ated.client1.txt
0x0030: 0D 2E 74 72 61 6E 73 6C 61 74 65 64 0A            ..translated.
0x003D:
$

If I had to guess, you read the file name (client1.txt) from a file created on a Windows box and transferred to Unix using a binary rather than text transfer, and you probably read it with gets() because that would remove the newline and not the carriage return before it.

I see the main code is using fgets() — much better than gets()! — but it is not equipped to deal with CRLF line endings. Your code does not check that the file names were opened successfully; this will lead to core dumps sooner or later (especially since the input file name on disk is very unlikely to end with a CR '\r' and therefore the open will almost certainly fail).

  • Always, but always, check that a file open function succeeds before using the file stream pointer or file descriptor.

Believe me; it is very seldom indeed that you'll find a bug in a routine as heavily used and tested as strcat().

share|improve this answer

A C program exhibiting such "unexplainably weird" behavior really suggests memory corruption of some sort - all the more likely in a multithreaded program. So you may have "narrowed down the problem" to this one part of code because that's where the symptom occurs, but that's not where the bug is.

Have you tried running translate() outside its normal context? Start your program in gdb, break on main(), and run translate("client1.txt"). Does it behave correctly?

If yes, this really suggests that some other part of the program is corrupting memory. And the only way to find out which part is to study all of the code, or use a tool like valgrind as suggested by @jbleners in the comments.

share|improve this answer
    
Running translate() alone in its own file produces the correct output. There really must be some memory problem. I will try to use valgrind and see what I can find. –  Sam Apr 26 '12 at 5:30

Well, it certainly ought to work as you're expecting.

One possible alternative would be to use sprintf instead:

void translate(char *filepath) { 
    char output_filepath[181];

    sprintf(output_filepath, "%s.translated", filepath);
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);
}

This should produce the same results as what you're using (should), but if you're running into a bug of some sort, perhaps a different function will work better. A quick test shows it working for me, but I'm pretty sure the version using strcpy/strcat would too, so you'll have to test to know.

Edit: here's a complete demo program:

#include <stdio.h>

void translate(char *filepath) { 
    char output_filepath[181];

    sprintf(output_filepath, "%s.translated", filepath);
    printf("%s\n", output_filepath);
}

int main(){
    translate("client1");
    return 0;
}

For me, with the compilers I have handy at the moment (VC++ 10, g++ 4.7) this produces the expected output ("client1.translated").

share|improve this answer
    
I tried what you have there and it still is overwriting and giving me just ".translated". This doesn't make sense! –  Sam Apr 26 '12 at 4:23
1  
@Sam: Could you post a complete program that compiles and demonstrates the problem? –  Jerry Coffin Apr 26 '12 at 4:24
    
Ed. I am sure that before the strcat output_filepath is "client1.txt" and after it becomes ".translated". I know strcat works but I don't know why it gives me this problem. –  Sam Apr 26 '12 at 4:36

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