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I have an array like this -

string[] input = new string[] {"bRad", "Charles", "sam", "lukE", "vIctor"}

Now I wanted to sort this according to position of capital letter occurring in each string. The first occurrence is the only occurrence to consider while sorting. If two strings have CAPs at same position then sort them alphabetically, the same applies to strings which does not have any CAPs, sort them alphabetically.

What I have done so far is not performing well enough. I have tried countless times to improve it but with no luck. There's going to be huge amount data on which this is tested. So performance is of foremost importance. I'm using .NET 2.0 and I'm not allowed to use any higher versions.

public static int q, p, i, s;
public static Dictionary<string, int> a = new Dictionary<string, int>();

Array.Sort(input, delegate (string x, string y) {

    if (x == y)
        return 0;

    if (a.TryGetValue(x + "|" + y, out s))
        return s;

    if (a.TryGetValue(y + "|" + x, out s))
        return -s;

    q = x.Length;
    p = y.Length;

    for (i = 0; i < x.Length; i++)
    {
        if (x[i] < 91)
        {
            q = i;
            break;
        }
    }

    for (i = 0; i < y.Length; i++)
    {
        if (y[i] < 91)
        {
            p = i;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (q == x.Length && p == y.Length)
        s = x.CompareTo(y);
    else if (q > p)
        s = 1;
    else if (q < p)
        s = -1;
    else
        s = x.CompareTo(y);

    a.Add(x + "|" + y, s);

    return s;

});
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When you say its not performing well enough, with what reference are you making this point? –  noMAD Apr 26 '12 at 5:09
    
Also, its slow because you are using too many if else conditions. You can do the above using just one for loop rather than two. –  noMAD Apr 26 '12 at 5:11
    
@noMAD With large amount of data this is taking a along time. Please help me with some code. –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 5:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Removing the dictionary for your cache alone sped it up (my example of 15000 values, with up to 500 chars per value) went from 2449.51ms with the dictionary, and after removing that went down to 58.72ms

I tried "craigmj"'s idea of caching the individual values position which is faster then doing the concat but it seems with my random data no cache was still faster.

Here is some code to test out... this runs in 30ms compared to 2559ms (original)

Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
stopWatch.Start();
Array.Sort(input, delegate(string x, string y)
{
    if (x == y)
        return 0;

    int shortestLength = Math.Min(x.Length, y.Length);

    for (i = 0; i < shortestLength; i++)
    {
        if (x[i] < 91 && y[i] < 91)
            return x.CompareTo(y);
        else if (x[i] < 91)
            return -1;
        else if (y[i] < 91)
            return 1;
    }
    return x.CompareTo(y);
});

stopWatch.Stop();
double ms = (stopWatch.ElapsedTicks * 1000.0) / Stopwatch.Frequency;
Debug.WriteLine("Optimized Time: " + ms);

code to continue checking for Capital

Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
stopWatch.Start();
Array.Sort(input, delegate(string x, string y)
{
    if (x == y)
        return 0;

    int xlen = x.Length;
    int ylen = y.Length;
    int longestLength = Math.Max(xlen, ylen);

    for (i = 0; i < longestLength; i++)
    {
        if (i < xlen && i < ylen && x[i] < 91 && y[i] < 91)
            return x.CompareTo(y);
        else if (i < xlen && x[i] < 91)
            return -1;
        else if (i < ylen && y[i] < 91)
            return 1;
    }
    return x.CompareTo(y);
});

stopWatch.Stop();
double ms = (stopWatch.ElapsedTicks * 1000.0) / Stopwatch.Frequency;
Debug.WriteLine("Optimized Time: " + ms);
share|improve this answer
    
Already did that and sped things up. What about the caching concept. How to go about with that. Any code examples, would you? –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 5:58
    
Whats the average length of your input array, and whats the avg length of each value? –  xer21 Apr 26 '12 at 6:06
    
Very hard to predict that. Can be of any length. Is delegate faster or writing a IComparable class and passing its object to Sort function, faster. And in you code what if the capital letter arrives after shortestLength, what then? –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 6:12
    
by the way, my suggestion is to NOT cache, originally you were using a dictionary object to act as a cache. Instead don't use that cache because the more values it adds to the cache the more values it has to sift through –  xer21 Apr 26 '12 at 6:13
    
My code should function exactly as your original in terms of what happens after the shortest length no? Can you run your data through my function and post results? –  xer21 Apr 26 '12 at 6:17

you need to think about your algorithm here :-)

How many elements are going to be in your dictionary? Well, since you're putting "{x} | {y}" into the dictionary for every element x, y in your array, that's n ^ 2 for an n-element array. Not a good idea.

This isn't necessarily the best solution (I've not thought about that yet), but for a start:

Only store the position of the first Capital in the dictionary for a particular word, not for combinations.

Now your delegate becomes:

delegate (string x, string y) {

    if (x == y)   // NOT A GOOD IDEA - 
                  // THE Sort method should not call a string with itself,
                  // and if this is doing string comparison
                  // (I'm rusty on C#), you're
                  // wasting a comparison if there's a mismatch
        return 0;

    int xCapitalPos, yCapitalPos;
    if (!a.TryGetValue(x, out xCapitalPos)) {
        // compute xCapitalPos and add it to dictionary a
    }
    if (!a.TryGetValue(y, out yCapitalPos)) {
        // compute yCapitalPos and add it to dictionary a
    }
    int delta = xCapitalPos - yCapitalPos;
    if (0!=delta) {
        return delta;
    } else {
        return x.compareTo(y);
    }
}

That's where I would start. See how you do, then consider how you might do better from there...

--- 5 minutes later, cup of coffee in hand

Ok, I've just thought of how I might improve it!

Don't use compareTo, which does a string comparison. Write your own string comparison function, that given 2 strings, will do a string comparison while taking capital location into account. Then you can drop the dictionary and everything else: it won't be necessary, since the Sort method (which I presume is implemented properly as a QuickSort or a MergeSort or something efficient) will ensure you don't do more comparisons than necessary.

All the best, C

share|improve this answer
    
About the first comparison, shouldn't I eliminate the iterations where x and y are equal, I mean sort is called with same value for both x and y. –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 5:17
    
No, sort shouldn't be called when x and y are equal! I'm assuming the Sort method is correctly implemented (which seems a safe assumption since it's a library call). It should never be called with the same values. (But easy to test: get your delegate to write the x and y to debug, and see if it is ever called with the same values :-) ) –  craigmj Apr 26 '12 at 5:22
    
Can you post some concrete code. I'm a bit confused about how to go about it. –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 5:35
    
This 'wasted comparison' is absolutely miniscule compared to the computation of the capital position, and I don't see any reason why Sort might not be called on equal values (I wouldn't assume such, anyway). The improvement will be far less than 1%! –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 26 '12 at 5:40
    
Agreed the comparison is miniscule, assuming it's doing a 'pointer' comparison aka Java (ie comparing whether these are the same string objects, rather than the same string values). (I'm rusty on C#, so not certain about that). But since the Sort is the Array.Sort library method, I would not expect it do call itself on the same values: this would be a very weird implementation, and I would definitely not expect that in a library. (i.e. you would never call delegate(arr[i], arr[i])) –  craigmj Apr 26 '12 at 6:08

I guess there are a couple of optimisations (it should already be damned fast).

Firstly, as suggested above there's really no need for a dictionary since the Sort algorithm itself optimises the need for that out.

Second, loop through x and y at the same time, and break out as early as possible (that is, if one finds a capital and the other doesn't then exit early). Minor savings here.

That should just about do it (and be simpler). You're basically rewriting String.CompareTo only, and efficiently, and relying on Array.Sort to do the rest.

share|improve this answer
    
As x and y can be strings with different length, how can I loop through them at the same time. –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 26 '12 at 6:00
1  
@xer21 has a good example of that in one of the other answers. –  yamen Apr 26 '12 at 6:33

Here's some (pseudo) code for the delegate that does a Capital-and-String position match:

delegate (string lhs, string rhs) {
    int llength = lhs.Length
    int rlength = rhs.Length

    // The value we will return 
    // <0 => lhs < rhs
    // ==0 => lhs == rhs
    // >0 => lhs > rhs  
    int ret = 0;
    Boolean uppercaseFoundAndEqual = false;

    for (int i=0; i<llength; i++) {
        if (i>=rlength) {
            // We've exhausted the rhs, but not the lhs
            return (0==ret) ? -1 : ret;
        }

        Char l = lhs[i];
        Char r = rhs[i];

        // We only worry about the case position if we've not yet found
        // an uppercase char in either string
        if (!uppercaseFoundAndEqual) {
            Boolean lUpper = (('A'<=l) && ('Z'>=l));
            Boolean rUpper = (('A'<=r) && ('Z'>=r));

            // If we've encountered an upper-lower difference, we return 
            int delta = (lUpper ? 1 : 0) - (rUpper ? 1 : 0);
            if (0!=delta) return delta;

            if (lUpper) {   // Both are upper case - by our delta comparison, we know 
                            // lUpper==rUpper
                if (0!=ret) return ret; // Return based on previous case comparison

                // Otherwise we've found an uppercase, now we're just doing
                // standard string comparison
                uppercaseFoundAndEqual = true;
            }
        }

        if (0==ret) {   // If we're still equal to this point, standard char comparison
            ret = l-r;
        }
        if (uppercaseFoundAndEqual && (0!=ret)) {
            return ret;
        }
    }
    if (i<rlength) {
        // We've exhausted the lhs, but not the rhs
        return (0==ret) ? 1 : ret;
    }
    return 0;   // We exhausted both strings and they're identical
}

Please take careful note:

  1. I've not tested this! (Hence the 'pseudo-code' comment) I don't have C#, so it's based on a little Googling for C# syntax. Please correct if I've made errors!
  2. This is not using Internationalization. In other words, this is a very basic ASCII comparison. Yuck! You should look at using System.Globalization.StringInfo, but I'm afraid to code that just based on some Googling!
  3. Your description doesn't describe what happens when two strings differ in length without capitalization. For example, is 'aa' greater than or less than 'aaA'? I've implemented based on the idea that we ignore capitalization outside the 'intersect' area, but it wouldn't be difficult to change that.
  4. (for emphasis) I've not tested this! Mileage may vary, but I believe the general idea is good.
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