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I'm having trouble performing a selection sort using pointer arithmetic rather than using the regular index notation. The reason I have to do this is for a class assignment. The whole point is to learn to use pointer arithmetic without "cheater indexing" (pointer + i), where i would be the index as such: array[i].

Before I call my sort function, I allocate an array of 1000 structures. The typedef is as follows:

typedef struct
{
    char* name;
    char* art;
    int rating;
} ENTRY;

The idea is that I read a file containing ASCII art. Each piece of art gets thrown into its own struct. Here's a single "entry" from the text file:

Jean Pajerek
  |\_____/|
  |[o] [o]|
  |   V   |
  |       |
 -ooo---ooo-
# 4

It's an owl! But what I need to do is store the name, art and rating in its appropriate field of the struct. My read function works perfectly. I allocate the array of 1000 structs, then just read the text file into it. It only contains like 18 images, so no worries there.

Now let's talk about my selection sort function. I started by taking a look at the selection sort algorithm for arrays of ints using index notation, then I tried to adapt it to my requirements.

  1. use pointer arithmetic
  2. moving around structures instead of ints

So here's the code:

void sort(ENTRY* aryptr, int* counter)
{
    ENTRY* slow;
    ENTRY* fast;
    ENTRY* lastmin;
    ENTRY min;
    ENTRY temp;
    int i;
    int j;

    printf("\n\n...SORTING\n\n\n");

    slow = aryptr;

    for (i=0; i < *counter - 2; i++)
    {
        min = *slow;        

        fast = slow + 1;
        for (j = i + 1; j < *counter-1; j++)
        {
            if (strcmp(fast->name, min.name) < 0 )
            {
                min = *fast;
                lastmin = fast;
            }
            fast++;           
        }

        temp = *slow;
        *slow = min;
        *lastmin = temp;

   slow++;      

    }
}

I'm using i and j as counters because I felt that testing for something like walker->name != NULL was unsafe. (Should I be trying to use a NULL test anyway? It does seem more "logically satisfying" to me, IF I can guarantee the thing after the last element is, in fact, NULL...) Regardless of what I use to track my locations for the slow and fast pointers, I have an issue with the sort.

The problem is like this: I have this art.txt file with a bunch of different pieces of art. Some pieces of art are by the SAME person.

VOLDEMORT
(art is hippogryph)
# 1
EDDARD STARK
(art is turtle)
# 4
EDDARD STARK
(art is owl)
# 3   
TONY STARK
(art is blob)
#1
EDDARD STARK
(art is dragon)
#5

When I finish sorting, pieces of art by the same author will be next to each other in the array. I don't care about the order of the art by the same person. Assume I sort it with my code: I get something like this.

EDDARD STARK
(art is turtle)
# 4
EDDARD STARK
(art is owl)
# 3      
EDDARD STARK
(art is dragon)
#5
EDDARD STARK
(art is turtle)
# 4
TONY STARK
(art is blob)
#1
VOLDEMORT
(art is hippogryph)
# 1

The sorted block of art by EDDARD STARK will have a copy of the FIRST PIECE OF ART in that block at the END. I've looked at my logic, printed various things to debug, but I still can't figure out where the problem is. I think I just won't be able to see it because I've looked at my own damn code so long. Any ideas?

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1  
I like the owl. –  st0le Apr 26 '12 at 6:26

1 Answer 1

void sort(ENTRY* aryptr, int* counter)
{
    ENTRY* slow;
    ENTRY* fast;
    ENTRY* lastmin;
    ENTRY min;
    ENTRY temp;
    int i;
    int j;

    printf("\n\n...SORTING\n\n\n");

    slow = aryptr;

    for (i=0; i < *counter - 2; i++)
    {
        min = *slow;        

        fast = slow + 1;
        for (j = i + 1; j < *counter-1; j++)
        {
            if (strcmp(fast->name, min.name) < 0 )//comparison
            {
                min = *fast;//save data to min
                lastmin = fast;//save position to last min
            }
            fast++;//increment index
        }

        //problematic, always swapping. need if statement. Lastmin
        //May go unassigned, then "slow" will be duplicated to "lastmin"
        temp = *slow;
        *slow = min;
        *lastmin = temp;//at first run through

   slow++;      //increment index

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It took me a while to understand what condition I needed, but I got it to work as needed now! Can't believe I didn't see something so blindingly obvious. Thanks! –  GrinReaper Apr 26 '12 at 8:13

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