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Say, I have a function like shown below

void caller()
{
    int flag = _getFlagFromConfig();
    //this is a flag, which according to the implementation
    //is supposed to have only two values, 0 and 1 (as of now)

    callee_1(flag);
    callee_2(1 == flag);
}

void callee_1(int flag)
{
    if (1 == flag)
    {
        //do operation X
    }
}

void callee_2(bool flag)
{
    if (flag)
    {
        //do operation X
    }
}

Which of the callee functions will be a better implementation?

I have gone through this link and I'm pretty convinced that there is not much of a performance impact by taking bool for comparison in an if-condition. But in my case, I have the flag as an integer. In this case, is it worth going for the second callee?

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2  
do which is more logical..there is no performance difference. – Naveen Apr 26 '12 at 7:42
    
Even if value == variable can help you not to write = instead of ==, it's considered a bit unprofessional these days, because every decent compilers warns you when you write only single =. Yoda comparisons, they are. Not needed anymore, they are. Readability decrease they. – Griwes Apr 26 '12 at 7:44
    
On typical platforms, if you use if (flag != 0) (or just if (flag)) instead of if (1 == flag), the code generated is the same as for bool. The compiler cannot know that 1 and 0 are the only legal values for the flag. – David Schwartz Apr 26 '12 at 7:46
    
@Griwes "it's considered a bit unprofessional these days" By whom? – Andreas Brinck Apr 26 '12 at 8:01

It won't make any difference in terms of performance, however in terms of readability if there are only 2 values then a bool makes more sense. Especially if you name your flag something sensible like isFlagSet.

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As sizeof(bool) = 1 on most platforms I ever did such check, I would rather say that it's stored as single byte rather than as an int (as int is guaranteed to be at least dword). – Griwes Apr 26 '12 at 7:46
    
What do you mean a bool is stored as an int? No it's not. – Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 7:47
    
Got confused with int and char! – Nick Apr 26 '12 at 7:48
    
Yes, in the actual code, I have put a sensible name. Just to ask the question, I wrote a dummy code here. – bibbsey Apr 26 '12 at 8:36

In terms of efficiency, they should be the same.

Note however that they don't do the same thing - you can pass something other than 1 to the first function, and the condition will evaluate to false even if the parameter is not itself false. The extra comparison could account for some overhead, probably not.

So let's assume the following case:

void callee_1(int flag)
{
    if (flag)
    {
        //do operation X
    }
}

void callee_2(bool flag)
{
    if (flag)
    {
        //do operation X
    }
}

In this case, technically the first variant would be faster, since bool values aren't checked directly for true or false, but promoted to a word-sized type and then checked for 0. Although the assembly generated might be the same, the processor theoretically does more work on the bool option.

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Even, I too was under the impression that bool values are promoted and then checked. That was the reason to post this question. But most of the replies convey that both are same. Now I'm confused :( – bibbsey Apr 26 '12 at 8:39
    
@SubithPremdas see this stackoverflow.com/questions/5764956/… – Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 8:40

If the value or argument is being used as a boolean, declare it bool. The probability of it making any difference in performance is almost 0, and the use of bool documents your intent, both to the reader and to the compiler.

Also, if you have an int which is being used as a flag (due to an existing interface): either use the implicit conversion (if the interface documents it as a boolean), or compare it with 0 (not with 1). This is conform with the older definitions of how int served as a boolean (before the days when C++ had bool).

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One case where the difference between bool and int results in different (optimized) asm is the negation operator ("!").

For "!b", If b is a bool, the compiler can assume that the integer value is either 1 or 0, and the negation can thus be a simple "b XOR 1". OTOH, if b is an integer, the compiler, barring data-flow analysis, must assume that the variable may contain any integer value, and thus to implement the negation it must generate code such as

(b != 0) ? 0: 1

That being said, code where negation is a performance-critical operation is quite rare, I'm sure.

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