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I have 2 divs: one in the left side and one in the right side of my page. The one in the left side has fixed width and I want the one of the right side to fill the remaining space.

The one on the right side is the navigation and I want it to to fill the remaining space on it right side:

My CSS:

#search {
    width: 160px;
    height: 25px;
    float: left;
    background-color: #FFF;
}

#navigation {
    width: 780
    float: left; 
    /*background-color: url('../images/transparent.png') ;*/
    background-color: #A53030;
}

My Html:

<div id="search">

</div>
<?php include("navigation.html"); ?>
<div id="left-column">

Thank in advance!

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4  
Remove the width and float property on the #navigation and it will work. –  Johan Leino Jun 23 '09 at 14:40
1  
^^^ This is the answer! –  Pointer Null Dec 19 '13 at 23:25
    
related stackoverflow.com/questions/4873832/… –  Adrien Be Feb 10 at 10:33
    
@alexchenco: you might want to update your chosen answer to the one provided by Hank –  Adrien Be Feb 10 at 10:34
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12 Answers 12

up vote 20 down vote accepted

This seems to accomplish what you're going for.

<html>

<head>
    <title>This is My Page's Title</title>
    <style type="text/css">
        #left {
            float:left;
            width:180px;
            background-color:#ff0000;
        }
        #right {
            width: 100%;
            background-color:#00FF00;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <div>
        <div id="left">
            left
        </div>
        <div id="right">
            right
        </div>
    </div>
</body>

 </html>

http://jsfiddle.net/MHeqG/

share|improve this answer
2  
You have to remove the width: 100% on the right div though to make it work. –  Johan Leino Jun 23 '09 at 14:39
    
I just copy and pasted that code out of a page i tested it on... the 100% works. –  Boushley Jun 23 '09 at 14:59
64  
This solution actually has a problem. Try removing the color from the LEFT element. You'll notice the color from RIGHT element is actually hiding under it. The content seems to go to the right place, but the RIGHT div itself isn't. –  Vyrotek Apr 13 '11 at 0:11
2  
+1 Solved my problem too. What I learned was that I needed to remove "float: left" on the filling div. I thought that would make the page implode –  keyser Aug 1 '12 at 8:20
3  
Perhaps good to notice that Vyroteks remark is true, but can be solved with overflow:hidden on the right column. Denzel mentions this, but his is not the accepted answer, so you could miss that... –  Ruudt Apr 23 '13 at 12:21
show 4 more comments

The problem that I found with Boushley's answer is that if the right column is longer than the left it will just wrap around the left and resume filling the whole space. This is not the behavior I was looking for. After searching through lots of 'solutions' I found this awesome tutorial on creating three column pages.

The author offer's three different ways, one fixed width, one with three variable columns and one with fixed outer columns and a variable width middle. Much more elegant and effective than other examples I found. Significantly improved my understanding of CSS layout.

Basically, in the simple case above, float the first column left and give it a fixed width. Then give the column on the right a left-margin that is a little wider than the first column. That's it. Done. Ala Boushley's code:

<html>

<head>
    <title>This is My Page's Title</title>
    <style type="text/css">
            #left {
                    float:left;
                    width:180px;
                    background-color:#ff0000;
            }
            #right {
                    margin-left: 190px;
                    background-color:#00FF00;
            }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <div>
            <div id="left">
                    left
            </div>
            <div id="right">
                    right
            </div>
    </div>
</body>

</html>

http://jsfiddle.net/CSbbM/

With Boushley's example the left column holds the other column to the right. As soon as the left column ends the right begins filling the whole space again. Here the right column simply aligns further into the page and the left column occupies it's big fat margin. No flow interactions needed.

share|improve this answer
    
When you close the div tag, the content after that div should be displayed in a new line but that is not happening. Can you please explain why? –  Fahad Uddin Jul 10 '11 at 1:33
    
should be:margin-left: 190px; you forgot ';'. Also margin-left should be 180px. –  Fahad Uddin Jul 10 '11 at 1:34
    
@JAP Thanks, fixed the semicolon. I found that I preferred, or needed, some excess margin between the columns to make the page look the way I wanted. But I'm sure its a matter of taste and design. Regarding your question: maybe the element in question needs something like clear:both; in its CSS. Because the left column is floating, new elements will appear next to it instead of below it unless you give them the clear property. –  Hank Jul 11 '11 at 18:46
    
Thanks for the explanation :) –  Fahad Uddin Jul 11 '11 at 22:27
6  
You're right Hank, your solution does look like it functions better. –  Boushley Aug 2 '12 at 16:34
show 5 more comments

The solution comes from the display property.

Basically you need to make the two divs act like table cells. So instead of usign float:left, you'll have to use display:table-cell on both divs, and for the dynamic width div you need to set width:auto; also. The both divs should be placed into a 100% width container with the display:table property.

Here is the css:

.container {display:table;width:100%}
#search {
  width: 160px;
  height: 25px;
  display:table-cell;
  background-color: #FFF;
}
#navigation {
  width: auto;
  display:table-cell;
  /*background-color: url('../images/transparent.png') ;*/
  background-color: #A53030;
}

*html #navigation {float:left;}

And the HTML:

<div class="container">
   <div id="search"></div>
   <div id="navigation"></div>
</div>

IMPORTANT:For Internet Explorer you need to specify the float property on the dynamic width div, otherwise the space will not be filled.

I hope that this will solve your problem. If you want, you can read the full article I wrote about this on my blog.

share|improve this answer
    
Now that's what I call a solution :) I'm sure backwards compatibility in IE will be a terrible mess but that's something I'm willing to sacrifice. –  Rolf Mar 14 '12 at 6:55
    
This helped me out tremendously! Thank you for the insight! I was trying to make a difficult looking header and this was the ticket! –  ntgCleaner May 12 '12 at 4:43
3  
Doesn't work when the content inside the div with width:auto is larger than the rest of the space available in the viewport. –  Nathan Loyer Jul 12 '12 at 19:04
3  
@einord, this solution does not use tables, and I'm aware that tables should be used only for tabular data. So, is out of context here. Actual tables and display:table(+other variation) properties are completely different things. –  Mihai Frentiu Oct 17 '13 at 13:18
2  
@einord, using HTML tables implies the definition of the whole table structure in HTML code. The CSS table model allows you to make almost any element behave like a table element without defining the whole table tree. –  Mihai Frentiu Oct 23 '13 at 10:11
show 5 more comments

@Boushley's answer was the closet, however there is one problem not addressed that has been pointed out. The right div takes the entire width of the browser; the content takes the expected width. To see this problem better:

<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
    * { margin: 0; padding: 0; }
    body {
        height: 100%;
    }
    #left {
        opacity: 0;
        height: inherit;
        float: left;
        width: 180px;
        background: green;
    }
    #right {
        height: inherit;
        background: orange;
    }
    table {
            width: 100%;
            background: red;
    }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="left">
        <p>Left</p>
    </div>
    <div id="right">
        <table><tr><td>Hello, World!</td></tr></table>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

http://jsfiddle.net/79hpS/

The content is in the correct place (in firefox), however, the width incorrect. When child elements start inheriting width (e.g. the table with width: 100%) they are given a width equal to that of the browser causing them to overflow off the right of the page and create a horizontal scrollbar (in firefox) or not float and be pushed down (in chrome).

You can fix this easily by adding overflow: hidden to the right column. This gives you the correct width for both the content and the div. Furthermore, the table will receive the correct width and fill the remaining width available.

I tried some of the other solutions above, they didn't work fully with certain edge cases and were just too convoluted to warrant fixing them. This works and it's simple.

If there are any problems or concerns, feel free to raise them. Thanks!

share|improve this answer
    
overflow: hidden indeed fixes this, thank you. (The marked answer is wrong BTW as right actually takes all the available space on the parent, you can see this in all browsers when inspecting elements) –  Wouter Huysentruit Nov 18 '12 at 10:36
1  
Can anyone explain why this works exactly? I know I've seen a good explanation somewhere here but I can't seem to find it. –  tomswift Dec 29 '12 at 19:36
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Boushley's answer seems to be the best way to go in order to arrange this using floats. However, it isn't without its problems. Nested floating within the expanded element will not be available to you; it will break the page.

The method shown basically "fakes it" when it comes to the expanding element - it isn't actually floating, it's just playing along with the fixed-width floated elements using its margins.

The problem then is exactly that: the expanding element isn't floated. If you try and have any nested floating within the expanding element, those "nested" floated items aren't really nested at all; when you try to stick a clear: both; under your "nested" floated items, you'll end up clearing the top-level floats as well.

Then, to use Boushley's solution, I'd like to add that you should place a div such as the following: .fakeFloat { height: 100%; width: 100%; float: left; } and place this directly within the expanded div; all the expanded div's contents should go then within this fakeFloat element.

For this reason, I'd recommend using tables in this specific case. Floated elements really aren't designed to do the expansion that you'd like, whereas the solution using a table is trivial. An argument is generally made that floating is more proper for layouts, not tables.. but you aren't using floating here anyways, you're faking it - and that sort of defeats the purpose of the stylistic argument for this specific case, in my humble opinion.

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I tried the above solutions for a liquid left, and a fixed right but non of them worked (I am aware the question is for the reverse but I think this is relevant). Here's what did work:

.wrapper {margin-right:150px;}
.wrapper .left {float:left; width:100%; margin-right:-150px;}

.right {float:right; width:150px;}

<div class="wrapper"><div class="left"></div></div>
<div class="right"></div>
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@Boushley

I'm pretty sure the design suggested by Boushley breaks down if #right is higher than #left. Try inserting:

<p>right</p>
<p>right</p>
<p>right</p>

As the contents of #right to see what I mean.

( I'm told there is no way to comment directly on Boushley's answer which is what I would have preferred. )

share|improve this answer
1  
There is a way to comment... if you read the very thread you linked to. –  Jimmy Cuadra May 20 '10 at 4:44
2  
Could you please let me know how? Remember, I have a reputation of 1 at the moment... I've read the thread again, and can't find the answer given my reputation. –  Peter V. Mørch Jun 8 '10 at 6:55
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@Boushley @Vyrotek is correct. I am also seeing this. Using firefox 4. This can be solved just by adding overflow:hidden in the #right CSS code of yours

PS: i would have commented in the answer, but cant see the option

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Since this is a rather popular question, I'm inclined to share a far superior solution using BFC.
Codepen sample of the following here.

.left {
  float: left;
  width: 100px;
}
.right {
  overflow: auto;
}

In this case, overflow: auto triggers context behavior and makes the right element expand only to the available remaining width and it will naturally expand to full width if .left disappears. A highly useful and clean trick for many UI layouts, but perhaps hard to understand the "why it works" at first.

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Tried all of these answers and none of them worked (Mihai's almost did, so +1 there, but I needed a larger inner element, so it broke).

Best solution (as of the date of this answer) remains: Use jQuery to set your div widths at runtime, using a pre-set constant for your fixed-width div size. You will save yourself a lot of headaches.

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/* * css */

#search {
 position: absolute;
 width: 100px;
}
.right-wrapper {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  padding-left:100px;
}
.right-wrapper #navigation {
 display: table-cell;
 background-color: #A53030;
}

/* * html */

<div id="search"></div>
<div class="right-wrapper">
   <div id="navigation"></div>
</div>
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I ran into this same problem trying to layout some jqueryUI controls. Although the common philosophy now is "use DIV instead of TABLE", I found in my case using TABLE worked much better. In particular, if you need to have straightforward alignment within the two elements (e.g., vertical centering, horizontal centering, etc.) the options available with TABLE give simple, intuitive controls for this.

Here's my solution:

<html>
<head>
  <title>Sample solution for fixed left, variable right layout</title>
  <style type="text/css">
    #controls {
      width: 100%;
    }
    #RightSide {
      background-color:green;
    }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
<div id="controls">
  <table border="0" cellspacing="2" cellpadding="0">
    <TR>
      <TD>
        <button>
FixedWidth
        </button>
      </TD>
      <TD width="99%" ALIGN="CENTER">
        <div id="RightSide">Right</div>
      </TD>
    </TR>
  </table>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
6  
You should never, ever, ever use tables for formatting anything but tabular data. EVER. –  mmmeff Mar 21 '13 at 13:35
    
The problem with tables is that the markup will be misleading if what you are trying to display is not meant to be tabular data. If you choose to neglect the principle of markup carrying meaning, you could as well get back to <font>, <b>, etc. HTML evolved past that to focus less on the presentation. –  Vilinkameni May 7 at 11:46
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