Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class A
    def p
        puts "1"
    end
end

a = A.new
a.p   #=> "1"

class A
    def p
        puts "2"
    end
end

a.p   #=>"2"

Is this ruby property called "Open Class"?Is there any other language have this property?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, this is called open class in Ruby. Off the top of my head, other languages which have this property include Python and Smalltalk. Also, even though they don't have classes, mutating a prototype object in ECMAScript, Self, Io and Ioke will have a similar effect.

share|improve this answer
    
Python doesn't really have open classes, does it? –  Yuki Izumi Apr 26 '12 at 10:46
    
A class is really just a dictionary of methods and a pointer (or in Python a list of pointers) to the superclass(es). In Ruby, that's hidden away from you, which is why you need special syntax to re-open a class. In Python, the method (or attribute) dictionary is made available to the programmer, so, in some sense, Python classes are even more open than Ruby classes: class A(object): def p(__self__): print("1") a = A() a.p() def p2(__self__): print("2") A.p = p2 a.p() (Imagine proper formatting :-) or see this Gist) –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 26 '12 at 11:43
    
thanks for your reply,in fact this question is pre-question of another one,will you answer this please?stackoverflow.com/questions/10335680/… –  Rinko Kobayakawa Apr 26 '12 at 14:40
    
@JörgWMittag: there's something about the way you're putting it that makes me imagine it's not 100% correct, but I'm not able to put my finger on it. –  Yuki Izumi Apr 26 '12 at 23:22
    
whoops, hit enter too quickly. In Ruby I might say it's less hidden away; the class object is in every sense a full object, it has its own metaclass, and you define methods on the class itself just like you can on a normal object's metaclass. –  Yuki Izumi Apr 26 '12 at 23:23

Although there are ways to do this in Smalltalk, I would tend to ask why you feel you want to do it and push for a different solution. Changing code at runtime is a recipe for making difficult code to debug.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.