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We know that the classic range random function is like this:

public static final int random(final int min, final int max) {
    Random rand = new Random();
    return min + rand.nextInt(max - min + 1);  // +1 for including the max
}

I want to create algorithm function for generating number randomly at range between 1..10, but with uneven possibilities like:
1) 1,2,3 -> 3/6 (1/2)
2) 4,5,6,7 -> 1/6
3) 8,9,10 -> 2/6 (1/3)

Above means the function has 1/2 chance to return number between 1 and 3, 1/6 chance to return number between 4 and 7, and 1/3 chance to return number between 8 and 10.

Anyone know the algorithm?

UPDATE:
Actually the range between 1..10 is just served as an example. The function that I want to create would apply for any range of numbers, such as: 1..10000, but the rule is still same: 3/6 for top range (30% portion), 1/6 for middle range (next 40% portion), and 2/6 for bottom range (last 30% portion).

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duplicate...... –  Mitch Wheat Apr 26 '12 at 9:20
    
@MitchWheat of? –  assylias Apr 26 '12 at 9:25
    
another very similar question on SO. Feel free to search.... –  Mitch Wheat Apr 26 '12 at 10:08
    
@suud: What would the ranges look like for different sizes? –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 26 '12 at 10:44
    
@MarceloCantos: for example if the range is between 1 and 10000 (1,2,3,...,9998,9999,10000). The range 1-3000 would have 3/6 chance, range 3001-7000 would have 1/6 chance, and range 7001-10000 would have 2/6 chance. –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 10:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the above algorithm:

int temp = random(0,5);
if (temp <= 2) {
  return random(1,3);
} else if (temp <= 3) {
 return random(4,7);
} else  {
 return random(8,10);
}

This should do the trick.

EDIT: As requested in your comment:

int first_lo = 1, first_hi = 3000; // 1/2 chance to choose a number in [first_lo, first_hi]
int second_lo = 3001, second_hi = 7000; // 1/6 chance to choose a number in [second_lo, second_hi] 
int third_lo = 7001, third_hi = 10000;// 1/3 chance to choose a number in [third_lo, third_hi] 
int second
int temp = random(0,5);
if (temp <= 2) {
  return random(first_lo,first_hi);
} else if (temp <= 3) {
 return random(second_lo,second_hi);
} else  {
 return random(third_lo,third_hi);
}
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Hi, how about if the range is between 1 and 10000 or any other range number? –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 11:02
    
please give an example on what do you mean –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 26 '12 at 11:10
    
Could you modify your algorithm so it can receive any input number for the min and max instead of using defined number? So that means the algorithm will be input-dependent (I hope the term is correct lol) –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 12:48
    
@sud the min and max will be limits for the range of generated numbers, right? I was asking about how would you pass the uneven probability for each of these numbers. Please give example input for a given range of numbers. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 26 '12 at 12:51
1  
@suud I have updated my response with as general solution as possible for the problem stated. If you specify the input better I can try to give a better solution closer to what you want. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 26 '12 at 14:27

Roll a 72-sided die to choose from the following array:

// Each row represents 1/6 of the space
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7,
 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9,
 9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10]
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Hi, could you elaborate more? I'm a bit confused. What can I understand from your arrays, the number '1' has 12/72 (1/6) chance. But from my rule above, number '1' should has 3/6 (1/2) chance. –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 10:08
1  
@sud: My reading of your question is that you want there to be a 3/6 probability of selecting a number from the first set. Since the set has three elements, the chance of selecting any given number from that set should be one third of that, i.e., 1/6. If there was a 1/2 probability of selecting a 1, and likewise a 1/2 probability of a 2 and 1/2 probability of a 3, then the probability of picking a number from the first set would be greater than one, which is nonsense. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 26 '12 at 10:42
    
okay, I got what you mean –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 10:52

You can fill an array of the desired numbers with the desired density, and then generate a random index and take the corresponding element. I think it is faster a bit, but propably it is not so important. Something like that, it's not the correct solution, just an example:

1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3,4,5,6 ...

Or you can define domains first with if statements, and then generate a simple number from that domain.

int x = random(1,6)
if (x < 4) return random(1, 3);
if (x < 5) return random(4, 7);
return random(8, 10);
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Except that the array is wrong for the desired density. See Marcelo's answer for the correct array. –  Steve Jessop Apr 26 '12 at 9:31
    
Yes, I know. But it is an example of what I thought. –  Matzi Apr 26 '12 at 9:45
final int lut[] = [
  1, 1, 1,
  2, 2, 2,
  3, 3, 3,
  4,
  5,
  6,
  7,
  8, 8,
  9, 9,
  10, 10
];

int uneven_random = lut[random.nextInt(lut.length)];

Or something along those lines...

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This might help if you're using whole numbers:

You need to use the following function:

f : A -> B

B = [b0, b1] represents the range of values you want from your random number generator

A = [b0, 2 * b1] so that the last branch of f actually reaches b1

f(x) = step((x / 3) , 
    f(x) is part of interval [b0, length(B)/3]
f(x) = step(x)  + E,   
    f(x) is part of interval [length(B) / 3, 2 * length(B) / 3],
    E is a constant that makes sure the function is continuous
f(x) = step(x / 2) + F,   
    f(x) is part of interval [2 * length(B) / 3, length(B)]
    F is a constant that makes sure the function is continuous

Explanation: it will take 3 times more numbers to get the same value on the first branch than it would on the second. So the probability to get a number on the first branch is 3 times than on the second, with values evenly distributed from a random number generator. The same applies for the 3rd branch.

I hope this helps!

EDIT: modified the intervals, you have to tweak it a bit but this is my general idea.

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you might need to tweak the intervals though –  Chris Apr 26 '12 at 11:57
    
Could you convert it to programming code? It seems very complicated for me... –  suud Apr 26 '12 at 15:12

As requested, here is my code (based on izomorphius's code) that hopefully solve my problem:

private static Random rand = new Random();

public static int rangeRandom(final int min, final int max) {
    return min + rand.nextInt(max - min + 1);  // +1 for including the max
}

/**
 * 
 * @param min           The minimum range number
 * @param max           The maximum range number
 * @param weights       Array containing distributed weight values. The sum of values must be 1.0 
 * @param chances       Array containing distributed chance values. The array length must be same with weights and the sum of values must be 1.0 
 * @return              Random number
 * @throws Exception    Probably should create own exception, but I use default Exception for simplicity
 */
public static int weightedRangeRandom(final int min, final int max, final float[] weights, final float[] chances) throws Exception {
    // some validations
    if (weights.length != chances.length) {
        throw new Exception("Length of weight & chance must be equal");
    }

    int len = weights.length;

    float sumWeight = 0, sumChance = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<len; ++i) {
        sumWeight += weights[i];
        sumChance += chances[i];
    }
    if (sumWeight != 1.0 || sumChance != 1.0) {
        throw new Exception("Sum of weight/chance must be 1.0");
    }

    // find the random number
    int tMin = min, tMax;
    int rangeLen = max - min + 1;

    double n = Math.random();
    float c = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<len; ++i) {
        if (i != (len-1)) {
            tMax = tMin + Math.round(weights[i] * rangeLen) - 1;
        }
        else {
            tMax = max;
        }

        c += chances[i];
        if (n < c) {
            return rangeRandom(tMin, tMax);
        }
        tMin = tMax + 1;
    }

    throw new Exception("You shouldn't end up here, something got to be wrong!");
}

Usage example:

int result = weightedRangeRandom(1, 10, new float[] {0.3f, 0.4f, 0.3f}, 
    new float[] {1f/2, 1f/6, 1f/3});

The code might still has an inaccuracy in distributing the subrange boundaries (tMin & tMax) because of division by weight resulted in decimal value. But it's unavoidable I guess, because the range numbers are integers.

Some input validations might be required, but I left out for sake of simplicity.

Critics, corrections and reviews are gratefully welcomed :)

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