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If I have a piece of code, say main.cpp that requires the classes defined in myheader.h is it bad practise to then include all the libraries/headers required for main.cpp in the myheader.h file?

If so, why? Considering that main.cpp won't work without myheader.h any way.

Sorry if this question is a little simple - I'm just unsure of the common practise with separating across multiple files.

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When you say define all the libraries required for main.cpp in the myheader.h file do you mean place the implementation of all the functions? Or maybe you mean include all the headers? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 26 '12 at 9:37
    
Also saying define libraries do you mean include libraries ? –  Karen Tsirunyan Apr 26 '12 at 9:39
    
Yeah, sorry wasn't too clear on the terminology - hope the edit clarifies things. –  QuantumO Apr 26 '12 at 9:45
    
@KarenTsirunyan: Hello, brother :D –  Armen Tsirunyan Apr 26 '12 at 9:51
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@ArmenTsirunyan: Hello, brother :D –  Karen Tsirunyan Apr 26 '12 at 10:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In general, you should include only those things that are needed in the current file. OK, so main.cpp uses myheader.h anyway, so why not include, say, <iostream> and other headers in myheader.h which are needed by main.cpp? Because tomorrow you will want to include myheader.h into myOthercpp.cpp which doesn't need <iostream> or other headers included in myheader.h, which is redundant and increases compilation time. So, whatever is needed in main.cpp, include in main.cpp.

There is an exception to this pattern which is called precompiled headers.

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and if I need the same library in main.cpp and myheader.h should I include it in both files or just in myheader.h? –  QuantumO Apr 26 '12 at 10:06
    
In case you need a certain library in myheader.h you have to include the library in it.But if you are including the myheader.h in your main.cpp it will be pointless to include the library either. –  Karen Tsirunyan Apr 26 '12 at 10:33
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@user1331900: I slightly disagree with Karen. You shouldn't generally rely on a header file to include other header files for you, unless it's a standard header which guarantees to include another standard header. Otherwise keep every file self-sufficient. Include guards will prevent multiple inclusion anyway –  Armen Tsirunyan Apr 26 '12 at 11:47

There are exceptions but generally it's good practice to not include headers inside headers.

Compilation Speed

For example if you have a big library biglibrary.cpp / biglibrary.h

A class that depends on the big library to do some work myclass.h / myclass.cpp

And some code that depends on MyClass - main.cpp


main.cpp doesn't depend on biglibrary. It doesn't need to know anything about it. It only depends on myclass.h. If myclass.h includes biglibrary.h than compiling main.cpp has to parse biglibrary.h as well slowing down compilation.

Cyclic Dependencies

Another problem is cyclic dependencies. Say you have 2 classes A, B. A references B and B references A

Do you include a.h in b.h or b.h in a.h

A much cleaner solution is to just include the headers you need in your source files.

If code in the header requires a reference to a class that doesn't exist use a forward deceleration like here: http://www.eventhelix.com/realtimemantra/headerfileincludepatterns.htm

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