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I love the idea of open source in the regards of "You buy it, its yourse to use, modify, etc" but i dont like the idea of someone taking my project, editing 5 lines, and reselling it commercially. If my class is in another project, so what; but if my whole project is being resold with minor modification, that idea kinda urks me.

So i want to use code.google.com in order to host my open source projects, but i want to use a license that keeps people (legally) from reselling or distributing for free (without significant modification) my project. Any suggestions?

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closed as off topic by duffymo, Flexo, martin clayton, Bill the Lizard May 17 '13 at 14:21

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My advice would be to hire a lawyer or stop worrying about it. I doubt that anyone will want your code. – duffymo Apr 26 '12 at 10:29
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Perhaps you should release your code using a restrictive copyleft license like the GPLv3. That way people can use your code in open source projects and any code they add or change will need to be released under the same license.

If someone decides to take your code and sell it they will need to also publish their source code which removes most of their commercial incentive...

http://www.gnu.org/licenses/quick-guide-gplv3.html

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