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Trying to get the following code to work; As the store variable is assigned an anonymous object, the "data" property is populated using a function call. This setting should also set the contents of the other object's property "masterData". I expected the "this" keyword to refer to the anonymous object being created, but I'm wrong...

    var store = {

        masterData : [],

        revert: function() {

            this.data = shallowCopy(this.masterData);
        },

        data: (function() {

            var overviewData = getOverviewData();
            this.masterData = overviewData;
            return chartData;

            }).call(),
    };

See also that "revert" property; It's given a function that'll create a copy of the object's data property contents.

What should be used, since "this" returns the DOMWindow object?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The data function is being called before the object is defined; this will not be an alias to an object prior to that object's coming into existence. You can use a constructor function with a private, short-lived variable:

var getOverviewData = function () { return "I'm overview data!" }
var chartData = "I'm chart data!"

var store = new function () {
  var _masterData
  this.revert = function() {
    this.data = shallowCopy(this.masterData)
  }
  this.data = (function() {
    _masterData = getOverviewData()
    return chartData
  }).call()
  this.masterData = _masterData
}()

console.log(store)
// { revert: [Function],
//   data: 'I\'m chart data!',
//   masterData: 'I\'m overview data!' }
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Indeed, makes sense... I'll refactor accordingly :) –  Jem Apr 26 '12 at 11:15

i have the same problem and i solved it by just sending the scope with the function.

    var self = this;
    setInterval( yourFunction(self), 1000);

    yourFunction:function( self )
    {
        console.log(this);
        console.log(self);
    }

you see when it logs "this" it refers to the DOM and the self is refering to where ever you came from. i hope this helps! :)

EDIT: instead of inside Data to set the masterData, set the Master data after the Data is created.

var store = {

    masterData : [],

    revert: function() {

        this.data = shallowCopy(this.masterData);     //Here is where you create data
        masterData = this.data.overviewData;       //set the masterData
    },

    data: (function() {

        var overviewData = getOverviewData();
        return chartData;

        }).call(),
};

i think this should work, otherwise sorry :)

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Hi, thanks for your input. The problem here is to obtain a pointer to the object being created. Data, revert and masterData are three members of this anonymous objects. And the definition of data needs to access the "masterData" member. –  Jem Apr 26 '12 at 10:49
1  
I think when you give the data the reference (self), you can say: self.masterdata = overviewData; (also in this case the name "self" isnt very clear though XD –  Arjen van Heck Apr 26 '12 at 10:54
    
sadly it's not possible to data: (var me = this; function() { var overviewData = getOverviewData(); me.masterData = overviewData; return chartData; }).call(), :( –  Jem Apr 26 '12 at 11:00
    
Nice try :) But I guess the explanation to this is like Richard mentions in an other answer below: "this will not be an alias to an object prior to that object's coming into existence". Thanks anyway! –  Jem Apr 26 '12 at 11:15

change the flolowing line

}).call(),

to

})()

or, if you really want to use the call method :

 }).call(store)
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