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A small doubt I have an application(exe) running in infinite loop, how long it executes.. I mean does it executes for years if my system is ON. or is there any timing limit for an application to run.

(If this is not correct place for this question please point me to the correct reference)

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closed as not constructive by sehe, Luchian Grigore, ApprenticeHacker, Alexey Frunze, Jens Gustedt Apr 26 '12 at 11:20

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As long as the electricity bill doesn't come. Then you'll go bankrupt. :D –  ApprenticeHacker Apr 26 '12 at 11:04
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Despite the fact this is going to get a lot of answers, this is stupid question that has surely been asked before –  thecoshman Apr 26 '12 at 11:06
    
There's not limit, for example the bank systems run for years without any problem. And another common exemple is the init program on linux, which run as long as your computer is on. Mine has 60 days and it's not a record –  Geoffroy Apr 26 '12 at 11:08
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I fail to see how this question is constructive though. –  ApprenticeHacker Apr 26 '12 at 11:11
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in·fi·nite/ˈinfənit/ Adjective: Limitless or endless in space, extent, or size; impossible to measure or calculate: "an infinite number of stars". –  Johnsyweb Apr 26 '12 at 11:11

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you application is running in an infinite loop, i.e.

while(1)
{
  //...
}

It will stop if an error is encountered and not handled correctly by your code, but otherwise it should run indefinitely.

It will terminate if there is an operating system related signal to kill the process. This may come from a user manually trying to kill the process, or it might occur because of a general memory shortage on the system. These types of operating system signal are generally out of your control. However, you can implement a method to detect if your process has been terminated (perhaps by using a daughter process) that will restart/resume the process should it be terminated unexpectedly.

If you add the process(es) to the startup script of your operating system, then you are also covered even in the event of a power failure or other type of event that may cause a reboot.

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does it executes for years if my system is ON

That's up to the operating system. Unix systems can be configured (using ulimit -t) so that the process is automatically killed once it's consumed a certain amount of CPU time.

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It can theoretically execute forever. But most programs complex aren't completely memory-efficient. It may consume more and more memory in time and may reach the process memory limit.

On x86 Windows systems, the process limit is usually 2GB

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But most programs complex aren't completely memory-efficient. => This is usually called a bug. –  Matthieu M. Apr 26 '12 at 11:08
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@MatthieuM. unless it's an undocumented feature. :D –  ApprenticeHacker Apr 26 '12 at 11:08
    
On Windows the limit is actually 16TB or 256TB depending on whether it's a 32-bit or 64-bit system (and obviously there's also a physical limit dictacted by the hardware, which many times is way less than the Windows-imposed limit). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 26 '12 at 11:21
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@R.MartinhoFernandes: He said the per-process limit, which is definitely not 16TB for a 32-bit system. –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '12 at 16:31
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@R.MartinhoFernandes: Partially mapped files are totally off-topic, if they aren't used by your language's memory allocator. –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '12 at 20:40

A program that never reaches it's end will run for as long as the computer is able to run it.

Though, if your program could cause a stack overflow or some other crash

eg (of program that will run for ever)

int main(){
    while(true){
        int i = 0;
    }
}

eg (of crashing program, fairly sure this will actually crash)

int main(){
    while(true){
        int *i = new int;
    }
}
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How will this generate a stack overflow or a crash? –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 11:06
    
it wouldn't :P I just didn't think to say what exactly I was giving an example of, but I have given one that should crash –  thecoshman Apr 26 '12 at 11:09
    
@thecoshman garbage-collected implementations won't crash on the second. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 26 '12 at 11:19
    
Good point, but not something to depend on –  thecoshman Apr 26 '12 at 12:11

It will execute until you reboot or otherwise kill the process.

If it's really an infinite loop you'll be annoyed enough to kill it pretty quickly though, as other apps will suffer from CPU starvation on the box. Not a deal-breaker if you are multi-core, but still an irritant to see all else slow down.

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Not unless you have a sleep in the loop. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 11:06
    
Right, or some other low CPU state such as 'Wait until signalled before working' –  Steve Townsend Apr 26 '12 at 11:07

It will be everlasting program. Either reboot or the system hang will kill the process

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An infinite loop will run as long as it is given all the required resources.

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An example from wikipedia:

In 2005, Novell reported a server with a 6 year uptime.[2][3]. Although that might sound unusual, that is actually common when servers are maintained under an industrial context and host critical application, think about banking system.

And there is always at least one process which will always run.

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I would simply point toward Wikipedia:

In 2005, Novell reported a server with a 6 year uptime.

Being in the business of writing software for servers, the processes are only stopped for maintenance operations. They are expected to run forever. In practice though, we distribute our loads so that the maintenance occur far more often than every 6 years, but a few months is not unusual.

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Simple Answer is, it may not run forever as you expected.

Your OS (Especially older versions of Windows) may require a reboot - Example : There’s a famous bug in Windows 95 and Windows 98 (now patched) that caused these systems to stop functioning after 49.7 days of uptime (Read Here). I hope latest versions of Windows don't have that kind of issue.

It also depends on the scheduler of your OS. There can be high priority tasks get run most of the times. I heard about some older Unix systems where the low priority tasks are starved for years to get a chance to run! . We won't face such extreme cases in desktop OS anyway.

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