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Integer i = ...

switch (i){
    case null:
        doSomething0();
        break;    
    }

In the code above I cant use null in switch case statement. How can I do this differently? I can't use default because then I want to do something else.

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6  
before switch check for null condition if(i==null) {//dosomething} –  nagarajub Apr 26 '12 at 11:09
    
This would actually make the switch useful. Other pattern matching languages work this way. –  Pyrolistical Jun 24 at 16:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 59 down vote accepted

This is not possible with a switch statement in Java. Check for null before the switch:

if (i == null) {
    doSomething0();
} else {
    switch (i) {
    case 1:
        // ...
        break;
    }
}

You can't use arbitrary objects in switch statements*. The reason that the compiler doesn't complain about switch (i) where i is an Integer is because Java auto-unboxes the Integer to an int. As assylias already said, the unboxing will throw a NullPointerException when i is null.

* Since Java 7 you can use String in switch statements.

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ok thx a lot guys –  hudi Apr 26 '12 at 11:09
3  
You can also use enums in switch statements. –  joriki Mar 29 '13 at 18:23
2  
It makes sense that you can't use a null Integer or other Wrapper class, because of unboxing. But what about enums and strings? Why can't they be null? –  Luan Nico Nov 2 '13 at 11:20
    
I'm not understanding why a short circuit of null being mapped to the "default" case or a special case for a null switch was not implemented for Strings. It makes using switches to simplify code pointless since you always have to do a null check. I'm not saying simplification is the only use for switches though. –  Reimius Jun 26 at 18:36

switch(i) will throw a NullPointerException if i is null, because it will try to unbox the Integer into an int. So case null, which happens to be illegal, would never have been reached anyway.

You need to check that i is not null before the switch statement.

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You have to make a

if (i == null) {
   doSomething0();
} else {
   switch (i) {
   }
}
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Java docs clearly stated that:

The prohibition against using null as a switch label prevents one from writing code that can never be executed. If the switch expression is of a reference type, such as a boxed primitive type or an enum, a run-time error will occur if the expression evaluates to null at run-time.

You must have to verify for null before Swithch statement execution.

if (i == null)

See The Switch Statement

case null: // will never be executed, therefore disallowed.
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You can't. You can use primitives (int, char, short, byte) and String (Strings in java 7 only) in switch. primitives can't be null.
Check i in separate condition before switch.

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2  
You can use enums too. –  Karu Oct 21 '13 at 5:08
4  
if the enum is null, you'll have the same problem. BTW, it's pretty strange that switch can't handle null, since it has a default clause –  Please let me out Nov 12 '13 at 14:07
    
@LeonardoKenji Default clause doesn't really have anything to do with null; whatever you're switching on it'll be dereferenced in order to check any other cases, so the default clause won't handle the null case (a NullPointerException is thrown before it has a chance to). –  Ben Mar 5 at 2:59
    
I think he meant the default clause should handle null as any other possible enum value that was not caught by the previous case's –  Leo Mar 6 at 4:05

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