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What is the regular expression to match FS00000 were the 0s can be a number from 0-9. There can only be 5 numbers following the FS.

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What language? Everyone is being forced to give generic answers, which may or may not be helpful to you. –  Michael Myers Jun 23 '09 at 15:21
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@phone: ...There can only be 5 numbers .... Exactly 5 "{5}" or up to five? {1,5}, or none to 5? {0,5} or... or... :) –  OscarRyz Jun 23 '09 at 15:28
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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted
^FS\d{5}$

which matches the line start (^ - you may not need this), then FS, then a digit \d 5 times {5}, then the line end $ (again, you may not need this, but you'd then have to protect against a sixth digit following).

You don't specify which language/regexp, but the above is pretty generic.

EDIT: You can provide word boundary markers instead of line start/end markers, which is a little more generic. \b will mark a word boundary (in Perl - see Perlre - but equivalents exist in other languages)

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Cheers I forgot the $ :( –  phone Jun 23 '09 at 15:23
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How about adding word boundaries instead of the start-of-line and end-of-line markers? –  Huppie Jun 23 '09 at 15:33
    
Yes - I think would be useful. I'll modify to suggest this –  Brian Agnew Jun 23 '09 at 15:36
    
... or you could upvote my answer ;-) –  Huppie Jun 23 '09 at 15:38
    
A shameless attempt at votemongering! But that would make sense. Done –  Brian Agnew Jun 23 '09 at 15:39
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Try

FS\d{5}

\d means any digit, and {5} means exactly 5 of them.

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shouldn't you add something like \D to prevent a sixth digit? –  tanascius Jun 23 '09 at 15:23
    
\d will match any Unicode Decimal Digit (fileformat.info/info/unicode/category/Nd/list.htm) if used in .NET –  VVS Jun 23 '09 at 15:25
    
This is the most basic form, and yes, it could be improved. Like for instance, I could have surrounded it with ^$ -- but the question was so vague that I didn't want to add possibly extraneous elements. –  Michael Myers Jun 23 '09 at 15:28
    
you are right - the question can be interpreted as "six digits are not possible" –  tanascius Jun 23 '09 at 15:30
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If the exact word should be matched don't forget word boundaries:

\bFS\d{5}\b

Depending on the language chosen the syntax for a word boundary might differ.

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Word boundaries look to be a good move here –  Brian Agnew Jun 23 '09 at 15:39
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FS[0-9]{5}

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Only 5 numbers means 0-5 numbers?

FS[0-9]\{1,5\}
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Note, that if FS00000 is part of other text and doesn't occupy the entire line, you should surround the FS\d{5} pattern by word boundaries rather than line boundaries:

\bFS\d{5}\b
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^FS[0-9]{5}$

will do the trick.

This matches any string that begins (^) with FS followed by 5 times 0-9 and then ends ($).

Don't use \d in this case since it will also match Unicode Decimal Digits (at least in .NET).

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