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I was wondering whether a design pattern or idiom exists to automatically register a class type. Or simpler, can I force a method to get called on a class by simply extending a base class?

For example, say I have a base class Animal and extending classes Tiger and Dog, and I have a helper function that prints out all classes that extend Animal.

So I could have something like:

struct AnimalManager
{
   static std::vector<std::string> names;
   static void registerAnimal(std::string name) { 
            //if not already registered
            names.push_back(name); }
};

struct Animal
{
   virtual std::string name() = 0;
   void registerAnimal() { AnimalManager::registerAnimal(name()); }
};
struct Tiger : Animal
{
   virtual std::string name() { return "Tiger"; }
};

So basically I would do:

Tiger t;
t.registerAnimal();

This could be worked into a static function as well. Is there any pattern (like a curiously recursive template) or something like that that can help me achieve this without explicitly having to call the registerAnimal method.

I want my class Animal to be extendible in the future and others might forget to call register, I'm looking for ways to prevent that besides documenting this (which I will anyway).

PS This is just an example, I'm not actually implementing animals.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can indeed do this using the curiously recursive template idiom. It requires nothing from whoever is extending the class that can't be enforced by the compiler:

template<class T>
struct Animal
{
   Animal()
   { 
      reg;  //force specialization
   }
   virtual std::string name() = 0;
   static bool reg;
   static bool init() 
   { 
      T t; 
      AnimalManager::registerAnimal(t.name());
      return true;
   }
};

template<class T>
bool Animal<T>::reg = Animal<T>::init();

struct Tiger : Animal<Tiger>
{
   virtual std::string name() { return "Tiger"; }
};

In this code, you can only extend Animal if you specialize it. The constructor forces the static member reg to be initialized, which in turn calls the register method.

EDIT: As pointed out by @David Hammen in the comments, you won't be able to have a collection of Animal objects. However, this can easily be solved by having a non-template class from which the template inherits and use that as a base class, and only use the template for extending.

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But now there's no base class, so there's no way to have a collection of animals. Make the class template inherit from some non template class and the original problem reappears. –  David Hammen Apr 26 '12 at 13:55
    
@DavidHammen hmmm that's true. Not in the requirements though. There's a vector of strings, not animals :). Besides, you can easily have a base non-template class Animal and rename the template as AnimalT. You could then have collections of Animal objects while you only extend AnimalT. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 13:58
1  
Wow this is a cool trick. I learn new stuff all the time on SO, +1. –  Seth Carnegie Apr 26 '12 at 14:23
    
@LuchianGrigore, while it looks really cool, actually it is not much better then parameter in constructor. This still does not work with inheritance (since you derive from Tiger, T will remain Tiger in Animal<T>::init) –  Lol4t0 Apr 26 '12 at 15:13
1  
@Lol4t0 yes, you are right. But that part isn't solved with the constructor with parameters either. It does solve the automatic part though. Still, to me, both look like overkill when you could just manually call register. I mean, I wouldn't put my code in production, but just state that all classes must be registered in the docs. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 16:02

If you insist every animal should be registered, why not just make name a parameter of Animal constructor. Then you can put register issues to Animal constructor and every derived will have to pass valid name and register:

struct Animal
{
   Animal(std::string name){ AnimalManager::registerAnimal(name);}
}

struct Tiger : Animal
{
   Tiger():Animal("Tiger"){}
};
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1  
Wow, great minds think alike! :) You and I must have pressed "Submit answer" at the same time. Actually I see now that you were 2 seconds faster ;) –  Brady Apr 26 '12 at 12:32
    
But this doesn't work. A call to a virtual method in a constructor is a shortcut to disaster. Please remove the answer at it is wrong. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 12:35
    
@Brady, yeah, but you answer more detailed. Also not, that you cannot execute virtual functions from constructor. By the time base class constructor called, VTable not filled yet for derived classes. –  Lol4t0 Apr 26 '12 at 12:36
    
@LuchianGrigore, where do you see virtual method in my answer? –  Lol4t0 Apr 26 '12 at 12:36
    
@LuchianGrigore The only problem with this answer is the call to name() in registerAnimal() –  Brady Apr 26 '12 at 12:37

This is a typical example where you want to do some sort of bookkeeping when an object is constructed. Item 9 in Scott Meyers "Effective C++" gives an example of this.

Basically you move all the bookkeeping stuff to base class. Derived class explicitly constructs base class and passes the information that is required for Base class construction. For example:

struct Animal
{
  Animal(std::string animal_type)
  {
    AnimalManager::registerAnimal(animal_type);
  };
};

struct Dog : public Animal
{
  Dog() : Animal(animal_type()) {};


  private:      
    static std::string animal_type()
    {
      return "Dog";
    };
};
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A call to a virtual method in a constructor is a shortcut to disaster. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 12:36
    
@LuchianGrigore: Where's the call to the virtual method? –  David Hammen Apr 26 '12 at 13:09
    
@DavidHammen he had name() before the edit, which is a method call. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 13:39
    
Thanks for the suggestion! –  AMCoder Apr 26 '12 at 13:53
    
@LuchianGrigore it was a copy-paste mistake. –  Vikas Apr 26 '12 at 14:07

Usually I do this with a macro.

Unit test frameworks often employ the technique for registering the tests, e.g. GoogleTest

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Actually, Google Test's TEST macros create a new class and a static instance of that class for every test. The static instance's constructor runs automatically before main() and registers it with a test suite manager. –  Electro Apr 26 '12 at 12:44
    
I'd need to check but I don't think the test is constructed statically. setUp is performed by the constructor, and only tests being run are actually constructed. You can filter tests, and their constructors will never be called. I think I remember a proxy class which is instantiated and registers the class. Or maybe that was my own implementation... –  Peter Wood Apr 26 '12 at 20:49
    
The tests are initialized separately for each run; the custom static class instance thing is merely there to enable the automatic test registration. –  Electro Apr 27 '12 at 8:17

You could just call a method in the base class constructor, which will get called everytime a derived class gets instantiated, as follows:

class Animal {
public:
    Animal() {doStuff();}
}

The doStuff() method could be implemented in the base class to do static operations, or it could be pure virtual and be implemented in derived classes.

Edit: As correctly pointed out in the comments, virtual methods cant be called in the ctor.

Notice though that the base class constructor will be called before the derived constructors, so you could also do something like this:

class Animal {
public:
    Animal(const std::string &name) {doStuff(name);}

private:
    Animal(); // Now nobody can call it, no need to implement
}

class Dog : public Animal {
    Dog() : Animal("Dog") {}
}

Hope that helps

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2  
If doStuff() is a virtual method of Animal, you can't use it in the constructor because the derived class instance hasn't yet been initialized, and bad things will happen. See parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/strange-inheritance.html#faq-23.5 –  Electro Apr 26 '12 at 12:33
    
+1 good point, I was just trying to propose more options. –  Brady Apr 26 '12 at 12:35
    
A call to a virtual method in a constructor is a shortcut to disaster. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 26 '12 at 12:36
    
The default constructor is automatically erased if you have any custom constructors, so making it private is redundant. Also, Dog doesn't even inherit from Animal. –  Electro Apr 26 '12 at 12:37
    
@Electro, today's not my day, too many typos and oversights (could have something to do with doing 20 things at once) :) I changed it so Dog inherits from Animal. Regarding the private constructor, you're right, but I always do that anyways since its easier to read and more explicit. –  Brady Apr 26 '12 at 12:59

@AMCoder: This is not the answer you want. The answer you want, reflection (e.g., what_am_I()) doesn't really exist in C++.

C++ has in a rather limited form via the RTTI. Using RTTI in the base class to determine the "true" type of the object being constructed won't work. Calling typeid(*this) in a base class will instead give you the typeinfo for the class being constructed.

You can make your class Animal have a non-default constructor only. This works fine for classes that derive directly from Animal, but what about classes that derive from a derived class? This approach either precludes further inheritance or requires class builders to create multiple constructors, one of which is for use by derived classes.

You can use Luchian's CRTP solution, but this too has problems with inheritance, and it also precludes you from having a collection of pointers to Animal objects. Add that non-template base class back into the mix so you can have a collection of Animals and you have the original problem all over again. Your documentation will have to say to only use the template to make a class that derives from Animal. What happens if someone doesn't do that?

The easiest solution is the one you don't like: Require that every constructor of a class that derives from Animal must call register_animal(). Say so in your documentation. Show the users of your code some examples. Put a comment in front of that example code, // Every constructor must call register_animal(). People who use your code are going to use cut and paste anyhow, so have some cut-and-paste ready solutions on hand.

Worrying about what happens if people don't read your documentation is a case of premature optimization. Requiring that every class call register_animal() in their constructors is a simple requirement. Everyone can understand it and everyone can easily implement it. You've got much bigger troubles on your hands with your users than a failed registration if your users can't even follow this simple instruction.

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