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I am getting unusual behaviour with my code, which is as follows

#include<stdio.h>
struct a
{
    int x;
    char y;
};
int main()
{   
   struct a str;
   str.x=2;
   str.y='s';
   printf("%d %d %d",sizeof(int),sizeof(char),sizeof(str));
   getch();
   return 0;
}

For this piece of code I am getting the output:

4 1 8

As of my knowledge the structure contains an integer variable of size 4 and a char variable of size 1 thus the size of structure a should be 5. But how come the size of structure is 8. I am using visual C++ compiler. Why this behaviour?

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1  
In printf() arguments you really should cast the sizeof values to (int) ... or (unsigned long) and use "%lu" ... or, if you have C99, use "%zu". –  pmg Apr 26 '12 at 11:53
1  
@pmg: Exactly. Because sizeof() returns a value of type size_t. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 26 '12 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It is called Structure Padding

Having data structures that start on 4 byte word alignment (on CPUs with 4 byte buses and processors) is far more efficient when moving data around memory, and between RAM and the CPU.

You can generally switch this off with compiler options and/or pragmas, the specifics of doing so will depend on your specific compiler.

Hope this helps.

Update
The comment from Yury deserves to be part of the answer

"You can generally switch this off" but I recommend never to do so, even if you need to parse some binary packet and have an idea to create a similar struct for effortless encoding/decoding. Remember, that on some targets (maybe in the past only) unaligned reading could lead to processor crash! Also this makes your code fully unportable.

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1  
You can generally switch this off, but I recommend never to do so, even if you need to parse some binary packet and have an idea to create a similar struct for effortless encoding/decoding. Remember, that on some targets (maybe in the past only) unaligned reading could lead to processor crash! Also this makes your code fully unportable. –  Yury Apr 26 '12 at 12:23
    
@Yury: if the compiler allows #pragma pack or similar stuff on such platforms, normally it will generate code to workaround the aligned read problem (typically memcpy to a separate, aligned location), otherwise such structures would be unusable. –  Matteo Italia Aug 15 '13 at 11:21

The compiler inserts padding for optimization and aligment purposes. Here, the compiler inserts 3 dummy bytes between (or after) your both members.

You can handle the alignment with #pragma directive.

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1  
perhaps (1) 3 bytes and (2) after –  Vlad Apr 26 '12 at 11:52
    
Yes, it's 3 bytes in this case, but I think it's between, isn't it ? –  md5 Apr 26 '12 at 11:54
    
well, it depends on the endianness of the target machine :) either iiiidddc or iiiicddd. –  Vlad Apr 26 '12 at 11:54

Mostly to illustrate how this padding actually works, I've amended your program a little.

#include<stdio.h>
struct a
{
  int x;
  char y;
  int z;
};
int main()
{   
   struct a str;
   str.x=2;
   str.y='s';
   str.z = 13;

   printf ( "sizeof(int) = %lu\n", sizeof(int));
   printf ( "sizeof(char) = %lu\n", sizeof(char));
   printf ( "sizeof(str) = %lu\n", sizeof(str));

   printf ( "address of str.x = %p\n", &str.x );
   printf ( "address of str.y = %p\n", &str.y );
   printf ( "address of str.z = %p\n", &str.z );

   return 0;
}

Note that I added a third element to the structure. When I run this program, I get:

amrith@amrith-vbox:~/so$ ./padding 
sizeof(int) = 4
sizeof(char) = 1
sizeof(str) = 12
address of str.x = 0x7fffc962e070
address of str.y = 0x7fffc962e074
address of str.z = 0x7fffc962e078
amrith@amrith-vbox:~/so$

The part of this that illustrates padding is highlighted below.

address of str.y = 0x7fffc962e074
address of str.z = 0x7fffc962e078

While y is only one character, note that z is a full 4 bytes along.

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