Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to be able to use ord() to get the same value as javascript's charCodeAt() function. The problem is that ord() doesn't support UTF8.

How can I get Ą to translate to 260 in PHP? I've tried some uniord functions out there, but they all report 256 instead of 260.

Thanks a lot for any help!

Regards

share|improve this question
    
@alex It's Ą not A –  bardiir Apr 26 '12 at 12:12
    
@bardiir Yeah I realised that moments after posting. –  alex Apr 26 '12 at 12:13
    
PHP or javascript? –  hakre Apr 26 '12 at 12:14
    
Sorry, should have been more clear. PHP –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:14
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

ord() works byte per byte (as most of PHPs standard string functions - if not all). You would need to convert it your own, for example with the help of the multibyte string extension:

$utf8Character = 'Ą';
list(, $ord) = unpack('N', mb_convert_encoding($utf8Character, 'UCS-4BE', 'UTF-8'));
echo $ord; # 260
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, the list function isn't working correctly? –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:26
    
It feels close though –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:27
    
list isn't a function, but a special form; list($ord) = $someArray is basically the same thing as $ord = $someArray[0]. list is handy when you want to assign the elements of an array to multiple variables, or to get around the fact that you can't add a subscript to an array expression that's not an actual array variable in PHP < 5.4. –  Mark Reed Apr 26 '12 at 12:30
    
Ah, I see. But when I'm executing the code above it's not outputting anything (it's blank). Any ideas how to turn this into a home run? –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:32
1  
print_r is giving me Array ( [1] => 260 ) which is rather strange that it's not zero indexed, but as long as it works I'm happy :) Thanks! –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:52
show 6 more comments

Try:


function uniord($c) {
        $h = ord($c{0});
        if ($h <= 0x7F) {
            return $h;
        } else if ($h < 0xC2) {
            return false;
        } else if ($h <= 0xDF) {
            return ($h & 0x1F) << 6 | (ord($c{1}) & 0x3F);
        } else if ($h <= 0xEF) {
            return ($h & 0x0F) << 12 | (ord($c{1}) & 0x3F) << 6
                                     | (ord($c{2}) & 0x3F);
        } else if ($h <= 0xF4) {
            return ($h & 0x0F) << 18 | (ord($c{1}) & 0x3F) << 12
                                     | (ord($c{2}) & 0x3F) << 6
                                     | (ord($c{3}) & 0x3F);
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
    echo uniord('Ą');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Sudhir, that works! What's the source of this function? –  Rila Apr 26 '12 at 12:27
    
well, actually i also got it from some source which currently i dont remember as i had this code since long time, sorry for that, but i hope the function will help you somve the problem –  Sudhir Apr 26 '12 at 12:31
    
Implementing UTF-8 by hand is fun and all; I've done it a few times. But I think it's smarter to use libraries maintained by someone else. Especially since then you can handle other encodings as well.. –  Mark Reed Apr 26 '12 at 12:36
add comment

mbstring version:

function utf8_char_code_at($str, $index)
{
    $char = mb_substr($str, $index, 1, 'UTF-8');

    if (mb_check_encoding($char, 'UTF-8')) {
        $ret = mb_convert_encoding($char, 'UTF-32BE', 'UTF-8');
        return hexdec(bin2hex($ret));
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}

using htmlspecialchars and htmlspecialchars_decode for getting one character:

function utf8_char_code_at($str, $index)
{
    $char = '';
    $str_index = 0;

    $str = utf8_scrub($str);
    $len = strlen($str);

    for ($i = 0; $i < $len; $i += 1) {

        $char .= $str[$i];

        if (utf8_check_encoding($char)) {

            if ($str_index === $index) {
                return utf8_ord($char);
            }

            $char = '';
            $str_index += 1;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

function utf8_scrub($str)
{
    return htmlspecialchars_decode(htmlspecialchars($str, ENT_SUBSTITUTE, 'UTF-8'));
}

function utf8_check_encoding($str)
{
    return $str === utf8_scrub($str);
}

function utf8_ord($char)
{
    $lead = ord($char[0]);

    if ($lead < 0x80) {
        return $lead;
    } else if ($lead < 0xE0) {
        return (($lead & 0x1F) << 6) 
      | (ord($char[1]) & 0x3F);
    } else if ($lead < 0xF0) {
        return (($lead &  0xF) << 12)
     | ((ord($char[1]) & 0x3F) <<  6)
     |  (ord($char[2]) & 0x3F);
    } else {
        return (($lead &  0x7) << 18)
     | ((ord($char[1]) & 0x3F) << 12)
     | ((ord($char[2]) & 0x3F) <<  6)
     |  (ord($char[3]) & 0x3F);
    }
}

PHP extension version:

#include "ext/standard/html.h"
#include "ext/standard/php_smart_str.h"

const zend_function_entry utf8_string_functions[] = {
    PHP_FE(utf8_char_code_at, NULL)
    PHP_FE_END
};

PHP_FUNCTION(utf8_char_code_at)
{
    char *str;
    int len;
    long index;

    unsigned int code_point;
    long i;
    int status;
    size_t pos = 0, old_pos = 0;

    if (zend_parse_parameters(ZEND_NUM_ARGS() TSRMLS_CC, "sl", &str, &len, &index) == FAILURE) {
        return;
    }

    for (i = 0; pos < len; ++i) {
        old_pos = pos;
        code_point = php_next_utf8_char((const unsigned char *) str, (size_t) len, &pos, &status);

        if (i == index) {
            if (status == SUCCESS) {
                RETURN_LONG(code_point);
            } else {
                RETURN_NULL();
            }

        }

    }

    RETURN_NULL();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. That is just like insanely complicated for something that should be a trivial built-in in the language proper! I’ll give you a +1 for effort, but wow, just wow! –  tchrist Aug 28 '13 at 22:29
    
Thanks. I added another example using htmlspecialchars and htmlspecialchars_decode. I posted for reading PHP source code and practing C language. I am considering to propose new string function for mbstring or PHP core. This function corresponds to Ruby's each_char. This function can be used for defining fallback functions such as mb_strlen and mb_substr. I implemented this function as PHP extension: blog.sarabande.jp/post/57645700697 (sorry for Japanse article). –  masakielastic Aug 30 '13 at 15:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.