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When I compile and execute this code consecutively for a couple of times, it reports the address of cc as 0x0012FF5C. But when I try to print out the string at that address using the second call to printf in foo, it prints garbage instead of printing out "Hello"?? Why so?? What's wrong if I directly paas the address as an argument when I know that the address lies within the address space of the application (atleast until I don't reboot my PC, or start some other application which requires a lot of space and which causes my application to be paged out)??

void foo(char *cc[])
{
    printf("%x\n",cc);
    printf("%s\n",(char *)(0x0012FF5C));
}

int main()
{
    char *c[] = {"Hello","World"};
    foo(c);
}
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2  
Why do you want to do this as you are just hedging your bets that the same address will be used? Make a little change and you break the code. Seems rather silly thing to do or even contemplate. –  Ed Heal Apr 26 '12 at 12:52
    
Please don't delete questions that are answered. Someone put in the effort to answer your question. –  Luchian Grigore May 6 '12 at 18:04

10 Answers 10

Because there is nothing in the C or C++ standard to guarantee that. Those addresses may be predictable depending your compiler/OS, but don't count on it.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    char s[] = "okay";
    printf("%p", (void*)s);
    return 0;
}  

I get a different address every time (gcc on linux). Don't use "address literals" ;)

Process address space on modern OS's is randomized for security on each execution:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Address_space_layout_randomization

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You should cast to void* your adress to be standard. –  md5 Apr 26 '12 at 12:38
1  
Hmmph. -Wall -pedantic says nothing but you are right, C99 draft says for fprintf "p The argument shall be a pointer to void". Edited. –  goldilocks Apr 26 '12 at 12:46
    
@Kirilenko: Is there not an implicit conversion from T* to void* for any –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 26 '12 at 14:01
1  
@David Rodríguez: it would not apply for this example because printf takes a variable number of arguments, whose types are not checked (and therefore, no automatic cast is performed) at compile time. –  danielkza Apr 27 '12 at 4:03
    
+1 for ASLR.... –  Karoly Horvath Apr 28 '12 at 23:52

Because the first printf gives you the address of an array of char* when the second printf try to print this array of char* as a string.

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Yep, cc needs to be dereferenced to get the pointer to the beginning of the actual string. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 26 '12 at 12:45

OK, first thing is, never assume that multiple executions will return the same addresses

Now. lets say you are lucky and get same addresses. Notice that cc is an array of pointers. And you are sending the base address of this array. You need to send the value of the first element of the array

Try this, and if your lucky it works,

printf("%s\n",*((char**)(0x0012FF5C)));
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well... the value of the base address and the value of the first element will be the same. –  user1232138 Apr 26 '12 at 12:41
1  
@user1232138 Check my edit! Base address and value are not the same. Dereferencing the Base address and the value at the base address are the same –  Pavan Manjunath Apr 26 '12 at 12:44

If you run your program on a machine without virtual memory and memory protection, you very probably would succeed. These technologies/features are why it doesn't work.

Each process has its own virtual address space, whose addresses are translated to hardware addresses by the processor's memory-management unit.

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I don't think your (0x0012FF5C) represents poiter. Try (char*)(0x0012FF5C).

Besides that, like other tell you, this has no practical value, as there is no guarantee string will be located at that address every run. This is not some embedded assembly where you say put this string at this location and later use the address directly.

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The memory location of your process may have changed between the both executions. You can't do that, you are trying to read an adress who isn't alloced by your process. Moreover I have many warnings :

test.c: In function ‘foo’: test.c:6: warning: format ‘%x’ expects type ‘unsigned int’, but argument 2 has type ‘char **’

test.c:7: warning: format ‘%s’ expects type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’

test.c:9: warning: format ‘%x’ expects type ‘unsigned int’, but argument 2 has type ‘char **’

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when I know that the address

Well, you don't really know anything about the address when you're hard-coding it, you're guessing at it.

There are lots of reasons why the address of a thing could change between executions of the same program. There are even more reasons why the address could change if you're changing the code (as you appear to be doing here).

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As someone previously said, your code location in memory, may vary between executions, and the same happens to variable's locations. Try running this code. It prints the actual address of the variable you point at in memory. You'll see that multiple executions yield to completely different addresses. Remember always that!

 #include <stdio.h>

 void foo(char *cc[])
{
    printf("%x\n",cc);
    printf("%s\n",(0x0012FF5C)); //this line will fail, there is no guarantee to that
    cc++;
    printf("%x\n",cc);
}

int main()
{
    char *c[] = {"Hello","World"};
    printf("c array location: %p",c); //print location
    foo(c);
}
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First thing, printf("%x\n",cc); doesn't print the address of cc. At best it prints the value of cc, but behavior is undefined because you've passed the wrong type argument for the format %x. It expects unsigned int, you've supplied a pointer.

The most likely behavior in practice is that it will print the least significant part of the value of cc (so on a 32 bit machine it will appear to work, whereas on a 64 bit machine you won't see the whole address). But it could go wrong in different ways.

Second thing, cc has type char**, and so the value of cc isn't a pointer to the first character of a string, it's a pointer to the first element of the array c from main. The %s format expects a pointer to the first character of a string. So even if the value of cc really is 0x0012FF5C, passing that value to printf with the %s format is wrong.

The "garbage" you're seeing is an attempt to print the pointer data from that array of pointers, as if it were character data belonging to a string. It isn't.

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I simplified your example a little bit. If you know the address of the string, you can read from that address.

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(char cc[])
{
    int i;
    printf("%p\n",cc);
    printf("Type the address you would like to read:");
    scanf ("%x",&i);
    printf("Character value at your address: %c\n",*((char *)(i)));
}

int main()
{
    char c[] = "Hello";
    foo(c);
}

This will allow you to read from an address you specify from the command line. It will first print out the base address of the character array, so you know where to look for the string.

Example:

$ ./a.out 
0xbfcaaf3a
Type the address you would like to read:bfcaaf3d
Character value at your address: l

As expected this prints the fourth letter of Hello.

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Why can' t we use that address to print the entire string? –  user1232138 Apr 26 '12 at 13:25
    
@user1232138: You can. Change the last line of foo to printf("Character value at your address: %s\n",(char *)(i)); –  Lucas Apr 26 '12 at 14:13
    
Tried that but didn't work... –  user1232138 Apr 26 '12 at 17:20
    
@user1232138: What do you mean it doesn't work? What happens? I just tested it and it did work. –  Lucas Apr 26 '12 at 19:50
    
It terminates abnormally saying that "some instruction" referenced "some memory location", which could not be read. I am on a 32 bit OS (winXP), if thats a problem.. –  user1232138 Apr 28 '12 at 2:50

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