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error C2129: static function 'void func(int,char *)' declared but not defined

I read that:

A static function must be defined within file scope. If the function is defined in another file, it must be declared extern.

Does file scope mean it must be defined in either the C++ or .h, or just within the .h file its declared in?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C++ compiler doesnot see the .h files, the content of the file will be placed into the cpp file by the pre-processor itself. Here the file scope would be that function should be in the cpp file.

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okay. cheers. Problem i have is there is a function declared as static in a file called util.h. If i right click and go to Go To Definition it brings me to the definition in the .cpp. But when I compile i get that error above. Both files are at the same location and i added that in the Additional Include Directories property. Do you have any ideas why this might be happening? –  discodowney Apr 26 '12 at 12:47
    
You should pay attention to the file what you actually compile when you get the error. When you compile Util.cpp and the function is defined in Util.cpp you won't get that error. –  harper Apr 26 '12 at 12:51
    
You need to remove the static function from util.h - static functions should only be in the .cpp file and can only be used in that .cpp file - if you need it in two .cpp files then it needs to be extern –  Mark Apr 26 '12 at 12:51
    
@Mark - It's also valid to have the entire static function in the header file. This acts much like a template function and the object code is created in every object file which uses that header. It can be handy in some circumstances. –  Benj Apr 26 '12 at 12:58

If the function is defined in another file, it must be declared extern.

In this statement, "another file" translates to "another object file" which will eventually be linked together after compiling. Like Naveen answered, the compiler doesn't really care in which source file the function is declared in.

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