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Does cc in the following code hold the base address of the array c, or does it hold the address of alphabet 'H' from "Hello"? If the answer is base address than why doesn't cc get incremented by 8 bytes after doing cc++, as it is supposed to be holding two pointers??

void foo(char *cc[])
{
    printf("%x\n",cc);
    cc++;
    printf("%x\n",cc);
}

int main()
{
    char *c[] = {"Hello","World"};
    foo(c);
}
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Have you tried it? What is the output that you got? In my 32bit platform there is an offset of 4... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 26 '12 at 13:13
1  
In my computer it does get incremented by 8 bytes. Maybe your platform isn't 64bit? BTW, for portability, use %p and convert the pointers to void* before printing. – asaelr Apr 26 '12 at 13:14
    
After I added the <stdio.h> header and replaced "%x" with "%p" and added a cast to the pointer values, ideone shows an increment of 4 ... – pmg Apr 26 '12 at 13:17

c is an array of pointers. The first pointer (c[0]) points to an array of characters that is composed of the letters Hello followed by the null character. c[1] points to another array of characters that contain World followed by the null character.

So cc will point to c[0] as described above. Increment cc it will be the same as c[1] as described above.

Best to draw these things out on paper to better to understand what is going on.

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Did you mean "Hello\0" and "World\0" instead of "hello\0" and "hello\0"? – Alexey Frunze Apr 26 '12 at 13:32
    
@Alex - Yes if you are pedantic - but you get the point. – Ed Heal Apr 26 '12 at 13:39
    
The OP has enough confusion with pointers, so fewer inaccuracies would probably help. – Alexey Frunze Apr 26 '12 at 13:45

It will get incremented by whatever sizeof(char*) is, as the array elements are char*:

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(char *cc[])
{
    printf("%x %s\n",cc,*cc);
    cc++;
    printf("%x %s\n",cc, *cc);
}

int main()
{
    char *c[] = {"Hello","World"};
    printf("sizeof(char*)=%d\n", sizeof(char*));
    foo(c);
    return 0;
}

Output:

sizeof(char*)=4
bf8fd910 Hello
bf8fd914 World

bf8fd914 - bf8fd910 = 4

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Well.. the array elements are char *, but when we say cc, it means the base address of the array, so incrementing cc should cause cc to be incremented by the array size.. – user1232138 Apr 26 '12 at 13:39
void foo(char *cc[])
{
    printf("%p\n",cc);
    cc++;
    printf("%p\n",cc);
}

int main()
{
    char *c[] = {"Hello","World", "yo"};
    foo(c);

    int *p = new int[1];
    int *q = p + 1;
    printf("p = %p and p+1 = %p \n", p, q);

    printf("sizeof(int) = %u, sizeof(dptr)=%u and sizeof
        sizeof(int), sizeof(c), sizeof(*c));
}

Each pointer is incremented by value = size of element it is pointing to.
So, an int pointer will be incremented by 4 bytes.
cc = {"hello", "world"} pointer will be incremented by 16 bytes i.e. 8bytes per ptr * 2
and cc = {"hello", "world", "yo"} pointer will be incremented by 24 bytes i.e. 8 bytes per ptr * 3

If the cc pointer is not statically initialized i.e. (char **c), the c will now act as a normal pointer. It will be incremented by 8 bytes.

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1  
+1 nice explanation :-) – peeyush Apr 26 '12 at 15:05

the array of the cc do have two pointer, the first point to the "hello",the other point to the "world"!cc is a array that is stored the pointer!

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