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Ruby on Rails 3.2.2, Ruby 1.9.3

I have array data from Siz.requirements.all (model) model fields (siz,heigth,wigth,kol)

[{:siz=>10, :heigth = 30, :wigth = 20, :kol = 24},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth = 30, :wigth = 10, :kol = 24},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth = 30, :wigth = 20, :kol = 33},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth = 20, :wigth = 20, :kol = 3},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth = 20, :wigth = 20, :kol = 5},...

how create array or hash with group by fields for example:

[{:siz=>10 => {:heigth=>"30" => {:wigth=>"20" => {:sum_kol => sum(kol)}}},         
{:siz=>10 => {:heigth=>"30" => {:wigth=>"10" => {:sum_kol => sum(kol)}}},
{:siz=>10 => {:heigth=>"20" => {:wigth=>"20" => {:sum_kol => sum(kol)}}}]
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2  
Your question is not very clear. Are you able to provide a better example of what your inputs and expected outputs are? –  d11wtq Apr 26 '12 at 13:52
    
edited, now okey? –  memoris Apr 26 '12 at 16:21
    
are :siz, :heigth, :wigth, and :kol supposed to be :size, :height, :width, and :col? I don't understand your nesting structure; you aren't actually combining all the elements with the same size into one element, so the nesting seems somewhat pointless. Seems like it would make more sense to have something like { 10 => { 20 => { 20 => sum }, 30 => { 10 => sum, 20 => sum } } } –  Mark Reed Apr 26 '12 at 16:29
    
@MarkReed Yes like this ` { 10 => { 20 => { 20 => sum }, 30 => { 10 => sum, 20 => sum } } } ` –  memoris Apr 26 '12 at 16:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If this is coming from a database, I would look at using the database to do the grouping and summarizing for you. But here's one way to do it in Ruby:

raw_data = [{:siz=>10, :heigth => 30, :wigth =>20, :kol =>24},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth =>30, :wigth =>10, :kol =>24},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth =>30, :wigth =>20, :kol =>33},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth =>20, :wigth =>20, :kol =>3},
 {:siz=>10, :heigth =>20, :wigth =>20, :kol =>5} ]

summary = {}
raw_data.each do |rec|
  size, height, width, col = rec.values_at(:siz,:heigth,:wigth,:kol)
  ((summary[size] ||= {})[height] ||= {})[width] ||= 0
  summary[size][height][width] += col
end

summary # => {10=>{30=>{20=>57, 10=>24}, 20=>{20=>8}}}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nicely @MarkReed. But values_at not method error. I am refactor this line. Thery thanks. –  memoris Apr 27 '12 at 2:48
    
? values_at is definitely a valid method on Hashes in ruby 1.8+. If you're having trouble we can fire up a chat session. –  Mark Reed Apr 27 '12 at 3:17
    
Thanks vary, we have solved the problem, move on. –  memoris Apr 27 '12 at 16:48

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