Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

At the moment I have some code like below which based on a NoOfRows properties returns whether all data has been entered into list(s):

switch (NoOfRows)
            {
                case 1:
                    return InputList1.Any();
                case 2:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any();
                case 3:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any();
                case 4:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any();
                case 5:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any();
                case 6:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any() && InputList6.Any();
                case 7:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any() && InputList6.Any() && InputList7.Any();
                case 8:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any() && InputList6.Any() && InputList7.Any() && InputList8.Any();
                case 9:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any() && InputList6.Any() && InputList7.Any() && InputList8.Any() && InputList9.Any();
                case 10:
                    return InputList1.Any() && InputList2.Any() && InputList3.Any() && InputList4.Any() && InputList5.Any() && InputList6.Any() && InputList7.Any() && InputList8.Any() && InputList9.Any() && InputList10.Any();
                default:
                    return false;
            }

I'm thinking it might be better to refactor this code and have an List<List<int>> or a Dictionary<int,List<int>> but how would I do the above to return whether each list in the collection has something in it?

List<List<int>> values = new List<List<int>>(){InputList1, InputList2 ... InputList10};
var lists = values.Take(NoOfRows);
lists.. //check each item and return value of Any for each one
share|improve this question
    
Are you saying you just want to check that every list in the collection of lists is non-empty? – James Michael Hare Apr 26 '12 at 14:05
    
@JamesMichaelHare Yes, just trying to refactor the above – Jon Apr 26 '12 at 14:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

having nested lists can work well. you might want to look into the use of selectmany

but I think the code you want is something like:

var nested = new List<List<int>>();
// put data in it

nested.All((inner) => inner.Any());
share|improve this answer

If you just want to know if any sub-list is empty, try this:

var values = new List<List<int>>();  // create and load up...

...

// returns true if any sub-list is EMPTY
var isAnyEmpty = values.Any(l => !l.Any());

This will check if there exists any list in the list of lists that does not have an item.

However, if you want the indexes of those sub-lists that are empty, you can just store the results of the Any() on all:

// will return a lists of bools for Any() applied to each sub-list
var listStates = values.Select(l => l.Any()).ToList();

Then, the index of any result where the value is false will be a list without any items. Or, alternatively, you could use the special form of Select that pass along indexes directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that last line be better as var listStates = values.Where(l => !l.Any()).ToList();? Why return a bunch of indexes when you can return the empty lists themselves? – Justin Morgan Apr 26 '12 at 14:35
    
@JustinMorgan: Point taken, though of course it depends on what the OP wants, really. They can return true/false, the references, or the indexes, whichever is most useful to them. – James Michael Hare Apr 26 '12 at 14:39
    
This is not working as expected: private bool AllExpectedDataReceived() { var Lists = InputLists.Take(NoOfRows); return Lists.Any(x => x.Any()); } – Jon Apr 26 '12 at 14:42
    
@Jon: how do you mean? the statement you are showing is missing the ! from my code snippet, it should be x => !x.Any(), it looks like your forgot the !. – James Michael Hare Apr 26 '12 at 15:02
var listoflists = new List<List<int>>;
bool allNonEmpty = listoflists.All(list => list.Any());
share|improve this answer

You may want to try something like this:

    bool ContainsEmptyCollection(IEnumerable<List<int>> collections)
    {
        foreach (var collection in collections)
        {
            if (collection.Count == 0)
                return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer

Do you mean something like this:

        List<List<int>> list = new List<List<int>>();
        bool anyNonEmpty = list.Any(x => x.Any());
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.