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Can anyone advise a simple way of replacing all negative values in an array with 0?

I'm having a complete block on how to do it using a numpy array

e.g.

a = array([1, 2, 3, -4, 5])

i need to return

[1, 2, 3, 0, 5]

a < 0 gives:

[False, False, False, True, False]

This is where I'm stuck - how to use this array to modify the original array

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up vote 61 down vote accepted

You are halfway there. Try:

In [4]: a[a < 0] = 0

In [5]: a
Out[5]: array([1, 2, 3, 0, 5])
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Try numpy.clip:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.arange(-10, 10)
>>> a
array([-10,  -9,  -8,  -7,  -6,  -5,  -4,  -3,  -2,  -1,   0,   1,   2,
         3,   4,   5,   6,   7,   8,   9])
>>> a.clip(0, 10)
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

You can clip only the bottom half with clip(0).

>>> a = numpy.array([1, 2, 3, -4, 5])
>>> a.clip(0)
array([1, 2, 3, 0, 5])

You can clip only the top half with clip(max=n). (This is much better than my previous suggestion, which involved passing NaN to the first parameter and using out to coerce the type.):

>>> a.clip(max=2)
array([ 1,  2,  2, -4,  2])

Another interesting approach is to use where:

>>> numpy.where(a <= 2, a, 2)
array([ 1,  2,  2, -4,  2])

Finally, consider aix's answer. I prefer clip for simple operations because it's self-documenting, but his answer is preferable for more complex operations.

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1  
a.clip(0) would suffice since the OP just wants to replace negative values. a.clip(0, 10) would exclude anything above 10. – Usagi Apr 26 '12 at 14:11
1  
@Hiett - I just tried it and clip will take one. First is assumed min. – Usagi Apr 26 '12 at 14:15
    
must be a version issue with numpy - heres my ouptut: (Pdb) np.clip(w,0) *** TypeError: clip() takes at least 3 arguments (2 given) - whereas: (Pdb) np.clip(w,0,1e6) array([[ 0. , 0.605]]) – bph Apr 26 '12 at 14:16
1  
@Hiett, what version of numpy? Did you try the clip method of a? The built-in function numpy.clip gives me the same error, but the method does not. – senderle Apr 26 '12 at 14:19
    
yeh if you call it that way round it seems to work, e.g. p w.clip(0) array([[ 0. , 0.605]]) - how queer? – bph Apr 26 '12 at 14:21

Another minimalist Python solution without using numpy:

[0 if i < 0 else i for i in a]

No need to define any extra functions.

a = [1, 2, 3, -4, -5.23, 6]
[0 if i < 0 else i for i in a]

yields:

[1, 2, 3, 0, 0, 6]
share|improve this answer
    
that is nice - i was wondering what the syntax would be to put the if statement inside the list comprehension - i was going wrong by sticking it after the for loop and only then getting two values back, e.g. [0, 0] for your example list – bph Apr 26 '12 at 16:48
    
I did the same when I originally learned about list comprehension and was trying out different things to test my understanding - it seemed more intuitive to put it after the for loop for me too. Now, though, this does :) Putting it before the for applies it to every element of the list, putting it after, means only if the condition is met does it go into the resulting list. – Levon Apr 26 '12 at 16:51
    
@Usagi Thanks for pointing out my earlier mis-reading of this question, I corrected the code. – Levon Apr 27 '12 at 5:44
1  
@Hiett It's just using the ternary operator (i < 0 ? 0 : i in C) inside a list comprehension. Put brackets in to make it clearer [(0 if i < 0 else i) for i in a]. Putting the if after is using the filter part of the list expression construct. [(i) for i in a if i < 0] will only return a list of items that are less than zero. – Paul S Apr 27 '12 at 7:52
1  
Numpy is powerful because it does a lot of the computation by compiled c code and is thus faster. Comparing this method to the others, I find almost a 10 times speed factor difference (this is slower). So while intuitive and easy to read, this is definitely not for the computationally intensive. – rspencer Jul 11 at 15:44

And yet another possibility:

In [2]: a = array([1, 2, 3, -4, 5])

In [3]: where(a<0, 0, a)
Out[3]: array([1, 2, 3, 0, 5])
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Here's a way to do it in Python without numpy. Create a function that returns what you want and use a list comprehension, or the map function.

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, -4, 5]

>>> def zero_if_negative(x):
...   if x < 0:
...     return 0
...   return x
...

>>> [zero_if_negative(x) for x in a]
[1, 2, 3, 0, 5]

>>> map(zero_if_negative, a)
[1, 2, 3, 0, 5]
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1  
had gone down this route but thought there must be an easier, more matlab less python way to do it with numpy (as i was using arrays rather than lists anyway). clip is perfect – bph Apr 26 '12 at 14:15

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