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Searched around a bit, but I didn't really find what I wat looking for.

I have to validate about 100 byte[16384]'s every second (+ many other tasks..). The biggest problem that looks around the corner is speed.

Do you guys know any good checksum algorithm within C#.NET that is insanely fast? It does not have to be very exact, but if a single bit changes, the checksum should (usually..) change as well.

The byte's are stored in memory, so there's no IO stuff which slows it down.

Thanks!

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1  
Most any checksum will need to go through every byte, and that's really the slow part. The operations performed on each byte tend to not be particularly expensive. If you're having real concerns try implementing several algorithms and profiling them to see which is fastest, and if it's fast enough for you. –  Servy Apr 26 '12 at 14:12
    
Every byte array however ends with many null bytes, however some do not. Do those also slow it down or is there some fast way to strip them off? –  Tgys Apr 26 '12 at 14:16
    
take a look at crc-32 –  Reniuz Apr 26 '12 at 14:16
1  
@Tgys How many is "many". Many to a person it's usually a lot for a computer. –  Servy Apr 26 '12 at 14:19
2  
The nulls are significant, though, right? You want the checksum to be different based on the number of them. –  Lou Franco Apr 26 '12 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If each single bit matters, the checksum algorithm would have to process each and every byte. A simple algorithm is simply adding each value and ignoring overflow:

    static unsafe uint GetChecksum(byte[] array)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            uint checksum = 0;
            fixed (byte* arrayBase = array)
            {
                byte* arrayPointer = arrayBase;
                for (int i = array.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
                {
                    checksum += *arrayPointer;
                    arrayPointer++;
                }
            }
            return checksum;
        }
    }

Of course you may not detect all changes and get duplicates, but it may give you an indication on how a fast algorithm performs.

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Clever idea actually, it seems to work fast enough so far. I'll do some more tests now. –  Tgys Apr 26 '12 at 14:32
1  
You should be able to speed this up by a lot by treating the byte* as a int* which will let you sum 4 bytes per loop instead of 1. I'll try to add code when I have time. –  JulianR Apr 27 '12 at 22:01

Expanding on C.Evenhuis's answer, here's some variations that should be quite a bit faster. I'm unsure though of their correctness, anybody with more bit-fiddling experience wanna help me out? I know they don't give the same checksum as the per-byte one, but I do think they give a checksum that's as good (not very, but apparently sufficient) as the per-byte one.

As I said in the comment, you could improve the speed a lot by not comparing byte-per-byte, but treating the array as a 4 times smaller array of ints, or an 8 times smaller array of longs. Treating it as a long[] only provides a performance benefit on 64-bit though.

static unsafe uint ChecksumInt(byte[] array)
{
  unchecked
  {
    uint checksum = 0;
    fixed (byte* ptr = array)
    {
      var intPtr = (uint*)ptr;

      var iterations = array.Length / 4;
      var remainderIterations = array.Length % 4;

      for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
      {
        var val = intPtr[i];
        checksum += val;
      }

      while (remainderIterations >= 0) // no more than 3 iterations
      {
        checksum += ptr[array.Length - remainderIterations];
        remainderIterations--;
      }
      return checksum;
    }
  }
}

static unsafe ulong ChecksumLong(byte[] array)
{
  unchecked
  {
    ulong checksum = 0;
    fixed (byte* ptr = array)
    {
      var intPtr = (ulong*)ptr;

      var iterations = array.Length / 8;
      var remainderIterations = array.Length % 8;

      for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
      {
        var val = intPtr[i];
        checksum += val;
      }

      while (remainderIterations >= 0) // no more than 7 iterations
      {
        checksum += ptr[array.Length - remainderIterations];
        remainderIterations--;
      }
      return checksum;
    }
  }
}

My performance measurements on 64-bit (Core 2 Duo 3 GHz) for an array of 100,000 items over 10,000 iterations:

  • Per 1 byte: 00:00:00.7052533
  • Per 4 bytes: 00:00:00.1761491
  • Per 8 bytes: 00:00:00.0856880

So quite a bit faster.

But, like I said, I don't know for sure if this provides an equally good checksum.

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