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Is it possible to stop a query after the first time the where condition is true?

I want to get only the first record which it's time is bigger than timeParameter. what I have now is:

var records = from rec in table
              where rec.time > timeParameter
              select rec;
return records.FirstOrDefault();

The time column in the database is ordered by ascending so the first time the where condition is true there is no need to keep querying. I have lots of rows in the database so I want the query to stop as soon as possible.

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1  
Your query is OK. Linq doesn't execute until you call FirstOrDefault() meaning it will only take the first iteration anyway. –  DangerMonkey Apr 26 '12 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should stop, actually. records is an IQueryable, so will not run until you request data (via FirstOrDefault), which will add the appropriate stop.

Basically, when you assign the records variable to the LINQ statement, it is merely loaded into memory as what the SQL WILL be. However, it does not evaluate anything until you actually make a call to access the data. At that point, the SQL will be modified appropriately based on whatever extension method you are using (FirstOrDefault in this case) and actually executed.

However, as Andrew Barber points out, your query needs to actually state the order by or else it will run without it. (Unless the table is truly sorted on the DB side as DangerMonkey counterpoints)

          from rec in table
          where rec.time > timeParameter
          order by rec.time
          select rec;

PS. If you want to really figure out how this works, then you can look into Expression Trees and deferred execution

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I think the code might require an OrderBy in order to do the FirstOrDefault(). –  Andrew Barber Apr 26 '12 at 14:31
1  
@AndrewBarber Noted :) –  Justin Pihony Apr 26 '12 at 14:34
    
He said that his table is already ordered, this is why he only need .FirstOrDefault(). Ordering using OrderBy will actually force the query to iterate on the entire table just to get the first one. –  DangerMonkey Apr 26 '12 at 14:37
    
@DangerMonkey Also Noted :) –  Justin Pihony Apr 26 '12 at 14:41
2  
@DangerMonkey: 1. he said the column is ordered, which doesn't really make sense, so it's unclear whether the table is ordered. 2. If it is ordered, the query engine will be smart enough to realize that it can ignore the ordering directive. 3. If it's indexed on that field, the query engine should be able to avoid a full reorder. 4. if he modifies the query (adding joins with other tables, etc), it's possible the query engine won't use the natural ordering of the underlying table. 5. Most importantly, other programmers may not know about the table's ordering. It's best to be explicit. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 26 '12 at 14:44

Your current code will do what you're asking.

The .FirstOrDefault() method short-circuits. In this case, it produces an SQL query that starts with SELECT TOP 1 ..., which the SQL Server engine knows to mean it can stop evaluating after it finds the first item.

When you say:

The time column in the database is ordered by ascending...

Do you mean that the whole table is ordered ascending by the time column? If that's the case, then the natural order of these elements is probably going to be correct. Nevertheless, I would throw an order by statement in there to ensure you're getting the ordering you want. The worst case is that the query engine will discard it as unnecessary.

var records = from rec in table
              where rec.time > timeParameter
              order by rec.time
              select rec;
return records.FirstOrDefault();
share|improve this answer
    
I think it needs an OrderBy clause, though. –  Andrew Barber Apr 26 '12 at 14:29
1  
@AndrewBarber: I was thinking the same thing. I updated the answer along those lines. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 26 '12 at 14:35
    
As I commented on Justin answer, a OrderBy clause will cause the query to iterate on the whole table in order to get the right order and get the first entry. If the table is already sorted, it doesn't need to be sorted again at runtime. –  DangerMonkey Apr 26 '12 at 14:40
2  
@DangerMonkey: As I responded on Justin's answer, I still think it's a good idea to keep the order by. In the worst case, the query engine will optimize this away. In the best case, may prevent bugs. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 26 '12 at 14:47
    
@StriplingWarrior I know. Thanks for taking time to explain why in details, it helped me understand OrderBy a little better. –  DangerMonkey Apr 26 '12 at 14:56

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