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Right, please bear with me as I have two separate attempts I'll cover below.

I first started off reading the guide here (http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files/). However whilst it contains what appears to be a good example of how to use read(), it does not contain an example of how to use write().

I first attempted to store a simple char array in binary using write(). My original idea (and hope) was that I could append to this file with new entries using ios::app. Originally this appeared to work, but I was getting junk output as well. A post on another forum for help suggested I lacked a null terminator on the end of my char array. I applied this (or at least attempted to based on how I was shown) as can be seen in the example below. Unfortunately, this meant that read() no longer functioned properly because it won't read past the null terminator.

I was also told that doing char *memoryBlock is 'abuse' of C++ standard or something, and is unsafe, and that I should instead define an array of an exact size, ie char memoryBlock[5], however what if I wish to write char data to a file that could be of any size? How do I proceed then? The code below includes various commented out lines of code indicating various attempts I have made and different variations, including some of the suggestions I mentioned above. I do wish to try and use good-practice code, so if char *memoryBlock is unsafe, or any other lines of code, I wish to amend this.

I would also like to clarify that I am trying to write chars here for testing purposes only, so please do not suggest that I should write in text mode rather than binary mode instead. I'll elaborate further in the second part of this question under the code below.

First code:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
//#include <string>


int main()
{
    //char memoryBlock[5];
    char *memoryBlock;
    char *memoryBlockTwo;
    std::ifstream::pos_type size;// The number of characters to be read or written from/to the memory block.

    std::ofstream myFile;
    myFile.open("Example", std::ios::out | /*std::ios::app |*/ std::ios::binary);

    if(myFile.is_open() && myFile.good())
    {
        //myFile.seekp(0,std::ios::end);
        std::cout<<"File opening successfully completed."<<std::endl;
        memoryBlock = "THEN";
        //myFile.write(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*4));
        //memoryBlock = "NOW THIS";

        //strcpy_s(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*5),"THIS");
        //memoryBlock = "THEN";
        //strcpy(memoryBlock, "THIS");
        //memoryBlock[5] = NULL;
        myFile.write(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*5));
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout<<"File opening NOT successfully completed."<<std::endl;
    }
    myFile.close();

    std::ifstream myFileInput;
    myFileInput.open("Example", std::ios::in | std::ios::binary | std::ios::ate);

    if(myFileInput.is_open() && myFileInput.good())
    {
        std::cout<<"File opening successfully completed.  Again."<<std::endl;

        std::cout<<"READ:"<<std::endl;
        size = myFileInput.tellg();

        memoryBlockTwo = new char[size];
        myFileInput.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);// Get a pointer to the beginning of the file.
        myFileInput.read(memoryBlockTwo, size);

        std::cout<<memoryBlockTwo<<std::endl;

        delete[] memoryBlockTwo;
        std::cout<<std::endl<<"END."<<std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout<<"Something has gone disasterously wrong."<<std::endl;
    }
    myFileInput.close();
    return 0;
}

The next attempt of mine works on the basis that attempting to use ios::app with ios::binary simply won't work, and that to ammend a file I must read the entire thing in, make my alterations, then write back and replace the entire contents of the file, although this does seem somewhat inefficient.

However I don't read in and ammend contents in my code below. What I am actually trying to do is write an object of a custom class to a file, then read it back out again intact.

This seems to work (although if I'm doing anything bad code-wise here, please point it out), HOWEVER, I am seemingly unable to store variables of type std::string and std::vector because I get access violations when I reach myFileInput.close(). With those member variables commented out the access violation does not occur. My best guess as to why this happens is that They use pointers to other pieces of memory to store their files, and I am not writing the data itself to my file but the pointers to it, which happen to still be valid when I read my data out.

Is it possible at all to store the contents of these more complex datatypes in a file? Or must I break everything down in to more basic variables such as chars, ints and floats?

Second code:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

class testClass
{
public:
    testClass()
    {
        testInt = 5;
        testChar = 't';
        //testString = "Test string.";
        //testVector.push_back(3.142f);
        //testVector.push_back(0.001f);
    }
    testClass(int intInput, char charInput, std::string stringInput, float floatInput01, float floatInput02)
    {
        testInt = intInput;
        testChar = charInput;
        testArray[0] = 't';
        testArray[1] = 'e';
        testArray[2] = 's';
        testArray[3] = 't';
        testArray[4] = '\0';
        //testString = stringInput;
        //testVector = vectorInput;
        //testVector.push_back(floatInput01);
        //testVector.push_back(floatInput02);
    }
    ~testClass()
    {}

private:
    int testInt;
    char testChar;
    char testArray[5];
    //std::string testString;
    //std::vector<float> testVector;
};

int main()
{
    testClass testObject(3, 'x', "Hello there!", 9.14f, 6.662f);
    testClass testReceivedObject;
    //char memoryBlock[5];
    //char *memoryBlock;
    //char *memoryBlockTwo;
    std::ifstream::pos_type size;// The number of characters to be read or written from/to the memory block.

    std::ofstream myFile;
    myFile.open("Example", std::ios::out | /*std::ios::app |*/ std::ios::binary);

    if(myFile.is_open() && myFile.good())
    {
        //myFile.seekp(0,std::ios::end);
        std::cout<<"File opening successfully completed."<<std::endl;
        //memoryBlock = "THEN";
        //myFile.write(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*4));
        //memoryBlock = "NOW THIS";

        //strcpy_s(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*5),"THIS");
        //memoryBlock = "THEN AND NOW";
        //strcpy(memoryBlock, "THIS");
        //memoryBlock[5] = NULL;
        myFile.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&testObject), (sizeof(testClass)));//(sizeof(char)*5));
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout<<"File opening NOT successfully completed."<<std::endl;
    }
    myFile.close();

    std::ifstream myFileInput;
    myFileInput.open("Example", std::ios::in | std::ios::binary | std::ios::ate);

    if(myFileInput.is_open() && myFileInput.good())
    {
        std::cout<<"File opening successfully completed.  Again."<<std::endl;

        std::cout<<"READ:"<<std::endl;
        size = myFileInput.tellg();
        //memoryBlockTwo = new char[size];
        myFileInput.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);// Get a pointer to the beginning of the file.
        myFileInput.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&testReceivedObject), size);

        //std::cout<<memoryBlockTwo<<std::endl;

        //delete[] memoryBlockTwo;
        std::cout<<std::endl<<"END."<<std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout<<"Something has gone disasterously wrong."<<std::endl;
    }
    myFileInput.close();
    return 0;
}

I apologise for the long-windedness of this question, but I am hoping that my thoroughness in providing as much information as I can about my issues will hasten the appearance of answers, even for this (what may even be a simple issue to fix although I have searched for hours trying to find solutions), as time is a factor here. I will be monitoring this question throughout the day to provide clarifications in the aid of an answer.

share|improve this question
    
bit difficult to follow I'm afraid, I can't make out the problem because you have commented out code, please try to provide the minimum code that would reproduce the error. As a starter, you look like you have some memory allocation issues. Also what error, do you get a core dump, or do you get crap in the file? –  ColWhi Apr 26 '12 at 14:52
    
The code as it is currently provided produces the issues I have described. Excluding the second example with the vectors and strings, but I have explained the issue surrounding those with a request for answers. All you need to do is uncomment the code referring to vectors and strings in the class. –  Interminable Apr 26 '12 at 15:22
    
In the first example, this would not compile because memoryBlock is not defined. if you uncommented either one of the definitions, you have problems because you are not allocating any or enough space. –  ColWhi Apr 26 '12 at 15:38
    
I have uncommented the appropriate lines, sorry. –  Interminable Apr 26 '12 at 16:12
    
read will read past a NULL terminator in the file. std::cout just won't print past it. –  Dave Rager Apr 26 '12 at 16:48

1 Answer 1

In the first example, I'm not sure what you are writing out as memoryBlock is commented out and never initialized to anything. When you are reading it in, since you are using std::cout to display the data to the console, it MUST be NULL terminated or you will print beyond the end of the memory buffer allocated for memoryBlockTwo.

Either write the terminating null to the file:

    memoryBlock = "THEN"; // 4 chars + implicit null terminator
    myFile.write(memoryBlock, (sizeof(char)*5));

And/or, ensure the buffer is terminated after it is read:

    myFileInput.read(memoryBlockTwo, size);
    memoryBlockTwo[size - 1] = '\0';

In your second example, don't do that with C++ objects. You are circumventing necessary constructor calls and if you try that using vectors like you have commented out it certainly won't work like you expect. If the class is plain old data (non-virtual functions, no pointers to other data) you will likely be OK, but it's still really bad practice. When persisting C++ objects, consider looking into overloading the << and >> operators.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason there's no initial seekg is because ios::ate sets the initial position at the end of the file? At least that's how the site I linked describes it, and I do seem to receive data. If it's removed then I do indeed get garbage. –  Interminable Apr 26 '12 at 15:16
    
Yes you are correct, I missed that part. I have to admit, I use that flag never. –  Dave Rager Apr 26 '12 at 15:26
    
With my second example, where you say 'don't do that with c++ objects' are you referring to testVector = vectorInput;? –  Interminable Apr 26 '12 at 17:06
    
Yes, you cannot assume the internal memory layout of those structures and the data they contain is almost certainly not stored in contiguous memory with your object. (Again you can't assume but it's most likely dynamically allocated on a heap). Dumping your object as raw binary data will not get you the contents of those structures. –  Dave Rager Apr 26 '12 at 17:15
    
So I can't write vectors or strings in binary to a file. So what's my alternative for the contents of those? Should I write a function which will convert the contents of these to arrays of the appropriate type when writing, and something that will convert the data back when reading in? –  Interminable Apr 26 '12 at 23:42

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