Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have been given a Username and Password for a remote SFTP Server (hosted by someone else).

My SFTP Client program (that i use) asks for Keys to proceed. What key should i ask the SFTP provider to give us - public or private?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by casperOne Apr 30 '12 at 15:33

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You need to work on your accept rate by accepting some answers to previously asked questions (of course if those answers are applicable). –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Apr 26 '12 at 15:02
    
how do i accept an answer? thanks. –  Jasper Apr 27 '12 at 6:12
    
there's a tick mark displayed left to each answer (under vote counter). You can click on it to accept the answer. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Apr 27 '12 at 6:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You do not require keys in order to access a remote host using sftp. Either key-based or password-based access will work just fine, barring explicit configuration on the remote server to require one or the other.

In order to use ssh keys, you will need to first generate an ssh keypair and then place the public key in the appropriate place on the remote server. Exactly how to do this depends on what client you're using and what sort of access you have to the remote host.

In general: you would generate keys and provide the public key to the provider. It's possible that they may do it the other way (generate they keys and give you the private key), but this is less typical.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, to be clear, it is possible that the host has disable password-based auth for security (which is a good idea). –  Lattyware Apr 26 '12 at 14:57
1  
I had actually updated the answer to reflect that while you were writing that comment :). –  larsks Apr 26 '12 at 14:58
    
If the hoster had done that he wouldnt provide a username and pass instead he would ask for a public key to add to authorized keys –  Learath2 Apr 26 '12 at 23:03
    
It's always a possibility. There are some odd policies out there! –  larsks Apr 26 '12 at 23:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.