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I have the following program, which is storing four strings in map and printing first time. Now its running the another time to retrieve the stored values. But the second resutls are not same as first time results.

#include <map>
using namespace std;

void fun_call(void **,char * );
main(){
        void *data=NULL;
        char value[100];
        int i=0,j=0;

        char key[][10]={"disk1","disk2","disk3","disk4"};

        cout << "printing all mapped values " << endl ;
        data = (void *) malloc( 100);

        for(j=0;j<2;j++){
        for(i=0;i<4;i++){
                fun_call(&data,key[i]);
                memcpy(value,data,100);
                cout << "key ="<<key[i]<<" value is " << value << endl;
        }
        cout <<"====================="<< endl;
        }
}

void fun_call(void **tmp,char name[10])
{
        void *tmp_data;
        char str[100]="ravindra";
        int len =0;

        static std::map<std::string,void *> name_data_map;
        std::map<std::string,void *>::iterator iter   ;

        iter=name_data_map.find(name) ;

        if ( iter == name_data_map.end())
        {
                len=strlen(str)+strlen(name)+1;
                tmp_data = (void *) malloc ( len );
                strcat(str,name);
                memcpy(tmp_data,str,len);
                name_data_map[name]=tmp_data;
                cout << "Inside the if" << endl ;
        }
        else
                cout << "disk pos "<< iter->first << endl;
        cout << "Outside the if" << endl ;
        iter=name_data_map.find(name) ;
        memcpy(*tmp,iter->second,len);

}

Output:

$ ./a.out
printing all mapped values
Inside the if
Outside the if
key =disk1 value is ravindradisk1
Inside the if
Outside the if
key =disk2 value is ravindradisk2
Inside the if
Outside the if
key =disk3 value is ravindradisk3
Inside the if
Outside the if
key =disk4 value is ravindradisk4
=====================
disk pos disk1
Outside the if
key =disk1 value is ravindradisk4
disk pos disk2
Outside the if
key =disk2 value is ravindradisk4
disk pos disk3
Outside the if
key =disk3 value is ravindradisk4
disk pos disk4
Outside the if
key =disk4 value is ravindradisk4

any idea why the second iteration is giving all data as : "ravindradisk4"

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7  
All this memory-copying and pointer arithmetic is very hard to follow. It is quite likely you invoke undefined behaviour, but didn't notice. Please consider using std::string and asking again if the problem didn't go away. –  thiton Apr 26 '12 at 15:01
    
Agreed. I guess the problem comes from the fact that you didn't use memset to initialize the arrays to 0 after you allocated them; it's a bad practice to mix STL containers with C-style strings anyway. –  Emanuele Bezzi Apr 26 '12 at 15:06
3  
Why are you storing void* in the map when you are working with strings? Is there any reason why you can't work type-safe as done here: stackoverflow.com/questions/10333484/…? –  stefaanv Apr 26 '12 at 15:06
    
Pretty certain this code does not compile. Please show a good example as described by SSCCE –  AJG85 Apr 26 '12 at 15:13

4 Answers 4

len is set to 0 in the beginning of fun_call, so if in the second run it doesn't go into your if, memcpy copies 0 bytes in the end. So the last value in main() from the first iteration remains the same regardless of key.

share|improve this answer
    
good catch - thank you –  user1044923 Apr 26 '12 at 15:24

There are a lot of things wrong with your code, if it is intended to be a valid (or remotely idiomatic) C++ program.

As @starbugs points out, you're not using the right length the second time through to copy your result out. The one-line "fix" would be to change:

memcpy(*tmp,iter->second,len);

...to:

memcpy(*tmp,iter->second,strlen((char*)iter->second)+1);

For some basics on why brittle C string techniques are best replaced with C++ methodology, I like to show people this:

Learning Standard C++ As A New Language (PDF) by Bjarne

Once you've grasped that you might be more able to embrace the spirit in which C++ and the standard library should be used.

Your program is so trivial that it's easy to show how it can be simplified to produce idiomatic code which is far more robust and easy to read:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

string fun_call(string name)
{
    static map<string,string> name_data_map;

    map<string,string>::iterator iter;
    iter = name_data_map.find(name);

    if (iter == name_data_map.end()) {
        string mapvalue = "ravindra";
        mapvalue += name;
        name_data_map[name] = mapvalue;
        cout << "Inside the if" << endl ;
    }
    else
        cout << "disk pos "<< iter->first << endl;

    cout << "Outside the if" << endl;
    iter = name_data_map.find(name) ;
    return iter->second;
}

int main() {
    string keys[] = {"disk1","disk2","disk3","disk4"};

    cout << "printing all mapped values " << endl ;

    for(int j = 0; j < 2; j++) {
        for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++){
            string value = fun_call(keys[i]);
            cout << "key =" << keys[i] <<" value is " << value << endl;
        }
        cout << "=====================" << endl;
    }
}

I'll stop there at providing a basically equivalent program with the same output and control flow.

Notes:

  • In standard C++, main must have an int as the return type (though it doesn't need arguments or a return statement, oddly enough)

  • The using namespace std; line frees you from having to type std:: in front of things in front of standard library classes like string, map, and their iterators. But don't put that in header files because it can cause problems with other source files that include them and have their own definitions which might conflict with the standard names when not disambiguated.

  • If you use the standard library then value types do their memory management under the hood, and the memory they use is allocated inside the class and freed in the destructor. Should you ever need to do explicit memory management then use new and delete.

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I somehow liked the challenge of finding the mistake in your code, but I have to second what @HostileFork says here. Also, I would add that you really shouldn't use a static map here. –  starbugs Apr 26 '12 at 16:30

First off, in general, in C++ consider using new/delete instead of malloc()/free().

I am not sure what you are exactly trying to accomplish (i.e. why you continuously copy values) but you have no length set so memcpy() doesn't copy anything.

Another simple fix to this issue is to use the pointer stored in iter->second (note that you would be able to modify data then and update that map entry - so perhaps this is not what you want).

For instance, do not allocate memory for your data variable in main and simply change this line

memcpy(*tmp, iter->second, len);

to

*tmp = iter->second;

Now the pointer address of data in main is set to the pointer address stored in the map.

share|improve this answer

First of all, I'm not even sure how your code compiles. Your main function lacks a return type and void/no-return is just bad practice. Restructure it to accomodate a simple return of 0 and make its return type int.

Furthermore, several includes are lacking before it even compiles (namely, iostream and string). Instead of using using namespace std, try to "pull" only the things you need from the std namespace. Bringing it all in is a potential hazard and bad practice in general, because you might encounter naming convention collisions in the future (and that will bring forth lots of headaches).

Back to the issue at hand. You're, if you're not experimenting/punishing your mind, applying some very bad practices here. This much memory-copying and pointer shifting around I don't get to do even while I'm working with moving vertex buffers around. And match your allocations with deallocations, that's some very bad memory management. And in C++, we use new/delete.

Since you're passing in the address of the pointer to the data variable, you can simply modify data's pointer by using *tmp.

Since your name_data_map is static, it survives the loop. Therefore, the second data member of the iter is the actual pointer to the data object at hand. Simply change the last line of code of your second function:

*tmp = iter->second;

Anyways, that's my two cents... I don't even get what you're trying to do. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
You make some good points, however this isn't the solution to the given problem. It makes it work partially, but truth be told, OP's problem is riddled with bad practices, the static map really pops out. –  user1309389 Apr 26 '12 at 19:58
    
@DomagojPandža Yeah, well, this is all new to me. Hopefully it helps a bit. –  Fractal Resurgence Apr 26 '12 at 20:01

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