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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    if ( argc != 4 ) /* argc should be 4 for correct execution */
    {
        /* Print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */
        printf( "usage: %s filename\n", argv[0] );
    }
    else 
    {
        // We assume argv[1] is a filename to open
        char* wordReplace = argv[1];
        char* replaceWord = argv[2]; 
        FILE *file = fopen( argv[3], "r+" );
        /* fopen returns 0, the NULL pointer, on failure */
        if ( file == 0 )
        {
            printf( "Could not open file\n" );
        }
        else 
        {
            char string[100];
            int len = 0;int count = 0;int i = 0;int k = 0;
            while  ( (fscanf( file, "%s", string ) ) != EOF )
            {
                len = strlen(string);
                count++;
                char charray[len+1];
                if(count == 1)
                {
                    for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
                    {
                        charray[i] = replaceWord[i];
                        printf("%c\n", charray[i]);
                    }
                }
                //printf("%c\n", charray[0]);
                printf( "%s\n", string );
                if(strcmp(string, wordReplace) == 0)
                {
                    for(k = 0; k < strlen(replaceWord); k++)
                    {
                         fseek (file, (-(long)len), SEEK_CUR);
                         fputc(charray[k],file);
                         //replaceWord++;
                    }
                    //strcpy(string, replaceWord);
                    //fprintf(file,"%s",replaceWord);
                    //fputs(string, file);
                    //printf("\n%d\n", len);
                }       
            }
            fclose( file );
        }
    }
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

This code currently works in replacing the First word properly, but if there are multiple words that i want overwritten with the replace word or the word appears somewhere else in the text it will not properly change it, and it will change it to ram trash etc. I was curious if anyone could lead me to a reason why thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Your usage message doesn't match the required usage. It should, it seems, be something like Usage: %s search replace filename. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '12 at 14:56
    
Using fscanf() with %s means you will lose all the spaces in your input file when you echo the results to the output. (OTOH, it simplifies the string comparison code.) The fseek() logic is a little odd. Why don't you just compare the incoming string with the match word before you print anything: if the two are equal, print the replacement; otherwise, print the incoming string. No fseek() to worry about. You should only need one fseek(). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '12 at 14:58
    
Well I have to change the text in the file to a third word if they are a match, luckily they word to be changed to has to be the same size if that helps. p.s. the print statements are only in there to test and make sure that everything else is working, my apologies for not being more clear. –  kev2316 Apr 26 '12 at 15:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming the words are the same length (if not you have quite a few more issues): Let's say you have a 4 character word: fseek (file, (-(long)len), SEEK_CUR); will go back to position 0 (4-4), fputc(charray[k],file); will update to position 1, then you back 4 more which is an error but since you're not checking the return value from fseek you will not know this. At this point the algorithm is not working any more since your assumed file positions are all wrong

EDIT:

if(strcmp(string, wordReplace) == 0)
{
    fseek (file, (-(long)len), SEEK_CUR);
    for(k = 0; k < strlen(replaceWord); k++)
    {                         
        fputc(charray[k],file);
    }

} 
fflush(file); //you need to flush the file since you are switching from write to read

EDIT 2: reason for flush: from 4.5.9.2 ANSI C, similar paragraph in C99 7.19.5.3):

When a file is opened with update mode ('+' as the second or third character in the mode argument), both input and output may be performed on the associated stream. However, output may not be directly followed by input without an intervening call to the fflush function or to a file positioning function ( fseek , fsetpos , or rewind ), and input may not be directly followed by output without an intervening call to a file positioning function, unless the input operation encounters end-of-file.

Between the read and write you have the fseek already so that is not a problem

share|improve this answer
    
Good spot, missed that one –  JeremyP Apr 26 '12 at 15:42
    
Is there any recommendations on a fix for this, and they will be the same length that is required. –  kev2316 Apr 27 '12 at 2:13
    
edited with code. Personally I would also rethink your naming convention, having 2 variables names replaceWord and wordReplace in the same function can be confusing. The use of string as a variable name is also debatable. This might be just an exercise but would you want to put these in production code you might need to re-understand a few years later? –  msam Apr 27 '12 at 7:12

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