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How can I implement a function that does the same thing as ArrayList.remove(o)?

The closest thing I have is

Array.prototype.remove = function(o) {
    var index = this.indexOf(o);
    if(index == -1) {
        return;
    }
    return this.splice(index, index);
}

However it throws an error on the second line, claiming indexOf(o) doesn't exist. (cannot find function indexOf())

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1  
How are you calling the method? –  Mathletics Apr 26 '12 at 15:00
1  
As well as the above question, what browser are you using? IE doesn't have Array.prototype.indexOf in older versions. –  James Allardice Apr 26 '12 at 15:01
1  
Array.prototype.indexOf is not supported by IE7 and below. –  jAndy Apr 26 '12 at 15:02
1  
Your implementation works just fine in Chrome. jsfiddle.net/mattball/V8aLE –  Matt Ball Apr 26 '12 at 15:02
1  
If you're doing that operation a lot on lists of any appreciable size, you should probably be using a different data structure. –  Pointy Apr 26 '12 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Array.prototype.indexOf is not supported by IE7 and below. So you would need to shim that method aswell before, like

Array.prototype.indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf || function( search ) {
    for(var i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; i++) {
        if( this[ i ] === search ) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
};

(simplified example).

Furthermore, your call to .splice() is wrong, second argument is the length of elements you want to remove and it should be 1.

Array.prototype.remove = function(o) {
    var index = this.indexOf(o);
    if(~index) {
        this.splice(index, 1);
    }
};
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what is if(~index is it a bitwise op? –  ajax333221 Apr 26 '12 at 15:11
    
@ajax333221 ~ performs a bitwise negation. Bitwise NOTing any integer x evaluates to -(x + 1). Examples" ~0 = -1, ~2 = -3, ~-5 = 4. While it's a clever trick to use here, it makes the code more confusing to understand and maintain. –  Matt Ball Apr 26 '12 at 15:13
    
Thanks! That remove function works perfectly; I can't believe I missed that. –  user1003382 Apr 26 '12 at 15:15
1  
@ajax333221: MattBall explained it technically. Its actually just a shortcut for if( index > -1 ) –  jAndy Apr 26 '12 at 15:15
    
I'm not sure it's always going to be faster, however. –  Matt Ball Apr 26 '12 at 15:16

Another idea would be to use and "associative array", aka object literal with name value pairs and use the delete operator which works in all modern browsers.

var arr = {'x': somval, 'y': someval2 ...}
delete arr.x;
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