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Why I cannot put a breakpoint on line String a;?

public void localMethod() {
    String a;
    a = "haha";
    System.out.println(a);
}

I know local variable will not be initialized until I assign a value to it explicitly. But it is a line of code, it does something. Why I cannot stop there? What lines are eligible to be breakpoints?

I am using Eclipse, jdk6_31

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1  
Where in this code are you trying to put a break point ? At String a ? –  ring bearer Apr 26 '12 at 15:05
    
What IDE / debugger are you using? What Java version? –  Péter Török Apr 26 '12 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The declaration itself isn't really executable code - it's just declaring the existence of something. You should be able to put a breakpoint on the second line, which actually does something.

Admittedly I don't see any reason why an IDE shouldn't support the notion of adding a breakpoint to a non-executable line - it would probably have to really install the breakpoint at an executable point within the executing environment...

EDIT: To clarify what I mean, this code:

public void foo() {
    String a;
    String b;
    a = "hello";
    b = " world";
    System.out.println(a + b);        
}

will compile to the same bytecode as:

public void foo() {
    String a;
    a = "hello";
    String b;
    b = " world";
    System.out.println(a + b);        
}

No code has to execute due to a declaration - it doesn't reserve space at that point in time or anything like that. The compiler allocates a "slot" within the method's stack space, and will use that slot throughout the method - but it can reuse that same slot with no extra initialization even if the variable is declared within a loop, for example.

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I don't think this answer is right. it is executable code. –  Ziyang Zhang Apr 26 '12 at 15:35
    
@ZiyangZhang: You think? What do you think happens when this code is "executed" exactly? Bear in mind that the stack space required for a method is allocated at the start of the method, not "on demand"... –  Jon Skeet Apr 26 '12 at 16:12
    
My understanding is String a; and a = "haha"; compose a atomic executable commands set after compile. It makes no sense to stop in the middle of one single atomic executable commands set, so I can't make break point on "String a;", but can do it on a = "haha". I may misunderstood what you meant by "executable". –  Ziyang Zhang Apr 26 '12 at 17:08
    
@ZiyangZhang: It's not atomic at all. You could have declared the variable a long time before. The assignment is atomic, but the declaration is entirely separate, and doesn't do anything. Imagine you'd put another declaration for another variable between the declaration of a and the assignment of the value. That would have been entirely legal - but contradicts your idea of the "declaration and assignment" composing an "atomic executable commands set". –  Jon Skeet Apr 26 '12 at 17:27
    
What I learned from this is "You are not debugging exactly what you see.You are actually debugging bytecode, not source code.Some sentences which are not next to each other in source code might be compiled into an atomic set of commands".I thought about what you said. I think in that case, the compiler will reshuffle the declaration and initialization sentences and make them into several atomic commands sets. And each command set includes declaration and initialization. What's more, if a local variable is just declared and not initialized, the compiler may just ignore that line. –  Ziyang Zhang Apr 26 '12 at 17:40

Breakpoints are produced by the IDE/Compiler watching for certain lines being executed. These are represented by line numbers in bytecode. The bytecode that represents the declaration of a variable and the initialization is combined into one step during compilation. Therefore there is no break point available in the generated bytecode if the declaration of a variable is split out from the assignment.

Here's the bytecode for your example:

public class Example {
    public void localMethod() {
        String a;
        a = "haha";
        System.out.println(a);
    }
}

To:

public class stackoverflow/Example {

  // compiled from: Example.java

  // access flags 0x1
  public <init>()V
   L0
    LINENUMBER 6 L0
    ALOAD 0
    INVOKESPECIAL java/lang/Object.<init> ()V
    RETURN
   L1
    LOCALVARIABLE this Lstackoverflow/Example; L0 L1 0
    MAXSTACK = 1
    MAXLOCALS = 1

  // access flags 0x1
  public localMethod()V
   L0
    LINENUMBER 9 L0
    LDC "haha"
    ASTORE 1
   L1
    LINENUMBER 10 L1
    GETSTATIC java/lang/System.out : Ljava/io/PrintStream;
    ALOAD 1
    INVOKEVIRTUAL java/io/PrintStream.println (Ljava/lang/String;)V
   L2
    LINENUMBER 11 L2
    RETURN
   L3
    LOCALVARIABLE this Lstackoverflow/Example; L0 L3 0
    LOCALVARIABLE a Ljava/lang/String; L1 L3 1
    MAXSTACK = 2
    MAXLOCALS = 2
}

Notice there is no LINENUMBER tag for line 8, which in my IDE represents the String a declaration.

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I think this answer makes a lot sense. –  Ziyang Zhang Apr 26 '12 at 15:14
    
Thanks. I added a bit more to demonstrate the idea. –  John Ericksen Apr 26 '12 at 15:18
    
There isn't really any bytecode representing the declaration of the variable. –  Jon Skeet Apr 26 '12 at 17:31
    
Right, that is my point. There is no bytecode that represents the declaration of a variable. This is essentially combined with the initial assignment of that variable in bytecode. –  John Ericksen Apr 26 '12 at 20:23

There is no byte-code which corresponds to declaration of a local variable, so you can't set breakpoint on declaration, only on initialization.

Sample.java:

class Sample {
public void localMethod() {
    String a;
    a = "haha";
    System.out.println(a);
}
}

javac Sample.java; javap -c Sample

class Sample extends java.lang.Object{
Sample();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public void localMethod();
  Code:
   0:   ldc #2; //String haha
   2:   astore_1
   3:   getstatic   #3; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   6:   aload_1
   7:   invokevirtual   #4; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
   10:  return

}
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Breakpoints allow users to suspend the execution of a program at a particular location. Breakpoints are typically shown in the UI along with the source code. When a breakpoint is encountered during execution of a program, the program suspends and triggers a SUSPEND debug event with BREAKPOINT as the reason. Now.. When you compile it.. The declaration and assignment fall in a single step.. First it is declared and then assigned a value..so the final step is assignment..therefore, you can put a breakpoint on assignment but not on declaration.

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